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I have following elements in the page:

<div class="cl1 cl2"></div>
<div class="cl1 cl2"></div>
<div class="cl1 cl2"></div>

When I run this code:

<script>
    var elems = document.getElementsByClassName("cl1");
    for (var i = 0; i < elems.length; i++) {
        console.log(i + ": " + elems[i].className);
    }
</script>

I can see:

0 cl1 cl2
1 cl1 cl2
2 cl1 cl2

in console.

But this code:

<script>
    var elems = document.getElementsByClassName("cl1");
    for (var i = 0; i < elems.length; i++) {
        console.log(i + ": " + elems[i].className);
        elems[i].className = 'cl3'; // or = '' (removing all classes)
    }
</script>

gives:

0 cl1 cl2
1 cl1 cl2

on first run, and:

0 cl1 cl2

on the second run.

What is the reason of not modifying all the elements? I can see that elems.length is reducing when we touch elems[i].className, but what is the reason?

If we put var n = elems.length and change for-loop with i < n we will get Cannot read property 'className' of undefined error.

The question is how to modify all the classes from the first time?

Because I believe the following code looks very silly:

var elems = document.getElementsByClassName("cl1");
while (elems.length) {
    for (var i = 0; i < elems.length; i++) {
        console.log(i + ": " + elems[i].className);
        elems[i].className = 'cl3';
    }
    elems = document.getElementsByClassName("cl1");
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is that items is a live NodeList, meaning whenever you access items.length, the list is re-evaluated. When you delete elements, the list becomes shorter, but you keep the index.

You could convert the NodeList to an array first

    var items = [].slice.call(doc.getElementsByClassName('foo'));

The array size won't change when you delete the DOM elements.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! Your solution is very suitable for script I'm working with. –  Kremchik Jul 28 '12 at 22:49
2  
Instead of copying, you can also iterate the NodeList backwards. –  Francis Avila Jul 28 '12 at 22:49
    
@Francis Avila, yeah, you are right, thanks. Is is really much more easier. –  Kremchik Jul 28 '12 at 22:53
1  
Notice that you can also use: var items = document.querySelectorAll(".foo") that returns a non-live NodeList, so you don't need array conversion. See: developer.mozilla.org/en/DOM/Document.querySelectorAll –  ZER0 Jul 28 '12 at 23:21

The getElementsByClassName function returns a NodeList, not an array. NodeList objects are live — they track the DOM as it changes. (edit — Turns out that not all NodeList objects are live, but the ones that come back from that function are.)

When you change the class of the first element, it stops being part of the list of elements. Thus, when you increment "i", you skip one.

You can convert the NodeList object to an array (see the answer from @ama2) or you can just not change "i" of you're removing elements from the selected set.

share|improve this answer
    
Not all NodeLists are live. There exist static ones. (I'm not sure which DOM function returns such static NodeLists). –  Šime Vidas Jul 28 '12 at 22:41
    
@ŠimeVidas well that's interesting; learn something every day :-) –  Pointy Jul 28 '12 at 22:42
    
Zakas wrote about it in this article –  Šime Vidas Jul 28 '12 at 22:44

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