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I'm new to Ruby and confused about how I can make a method in Class similar to :attr_accessor, in that it adds methods to a user class, but so these added methods have access to a pre-initialized instance variable. It's difficult for me to explain so here is a greatly simplified sample of my efforts:

class Class
    def super_accessor_wow(attr_name)
        attr_name = attr_name.to_s 
        new_var_name = "@crazy_var_name"

        instance_variable_set(new_var_name, ["hi", "everyone"])

        module_eval(%Q/
            def super_#{attr_name}()
                return @#{attr_name}
            end

            def super_#{attr_name}=(value)
                @#{attr_name} = value
            end

            def greetings
                return #{new_var_name}
            end
        /)
    end
end

This is how I'm trying to use the new method on Class to modify my own class:

class Foo
    super_accessor_wow(:bar)
end

foo1 = Foo.new()
foo1.super_bar = 1000

puts foo1.super_bar
puts foo1.greetings.inspect

The first puts prints '1000'

The second puts prints 'nil', so my instance_variable_set call in super_accessor_wow seemingly has no effect.

I expected that the second puts would print '['hi', 'everyone']' by the way. All of this code is contained in a single Ruby file.

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I think you're looking for instance_variable_set(new_var_name.to_sym, ["hi, "everyone"]) as instance_variable_set takes a symbol, not a string. Unfortunately this doesn't solve the issue. –  Pete Schlette Jul 29 '12 at 0:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your instance_variable_set is called when you call super_accessor_wow during the class definition. No instance of the class exists yet. You create an instance of the class when you call new. You could add your @crazy_var_name initialization to the constructor, or you could define it in the greetings method:

Put the default in a class variable, and initialize the instance variable in the constructor (be aware that this creates a constructor for your class, and if you then create your own constructor, it will override this one):

class Class
    def super_accessor_wow(attr_name)
        attr_name = attr_name.to_s
        new_var_name = "@crazy_var_name"
        new_var_name_default = "@#{new_var_name}"

        module_eval(%Q/
            #{new_var_name_default} = ["hi", "everyone"]

            def initialize()
              #{new_var_name} = #{new_var_name_default}
            end

            def super_#{attr_name}()
                return @#{attr_name}
            end

            def super_#{attr_name}=(value)
                @#{attr_name} = value
            end

            def greetings
                return #{new_var_name}
            end
        /)
    end
end

class Foo
    super_accessor_wow(:bar)
end

foo1 = Foo.new()
foo1.super_bar = 1000

puts foo1.super_bar
puts foo1.greetings.inspect
puts Foo.class_variable_get('@@crazy_var_name').inspect
puts foo1.instance_variable_get('@crazy_var_name').inspect

Outputs:

1000
["hi", "everyone"]
["hi", "everyone"]
["hi", "everyone"]

Define it in the greetings method:

class Class
    def super_accessor_wow(attr_name)
        attr_name = attr_name.to_s
        new_var_name = "@crazy_var_name"

        module_eval(%Q/
            def super_#{attr_name}()
                return @#{attr_name}
            end

            def super_#{attr_name}=(value)
                @#{attr_name} = value
            end

            def greetings
                #{new_var_name} = ["hi", "everyone"] unless #{new_var_name}
                return #{new_var_name}
            end
        /)
    end
end

class Foo
    super_accessor_wow(:bar)
end

foo1 = Foo.new()
foo1.super_bar = 1000

puts foo1.super_bar
puts foo1.greetings.inspect

Outputs

1000
["hi", "everyone"]
share|improve this answer
    
Creating the instance variable in greetings is the approach I eventually went with, thanks. Can you demonstrate how to add the initialization to the constructor? I don't understand how to do that. –  Ian Durkan Aug 22 '12 at 2:56
1  
Edited my answer to include initialization in the constructor. If you create your own constructors in your classes, they'll override this constructor. You should then instead put @crazy_var_name = @@crazy_var_name in your own constructors. Or, if your instances never modify this value and only read it, then you don't even need the instance variable or the constructor, just use the class variable when you need to read it. –  Gary G Aug 22 '12 at 12:09
    
I see, thanks Gary. It seems like this overall approach is quite fragile and not very open-to-extension, good to know. –  Ian Durkan Aug 22 '12 at 14:44
    
Perhaps inheritance or mixins are better suited to the functionality that you are looking for. –  Gary G Aug 22 '12 at 17:38

As noted in the comment, instance_variable_set takes a symbol, not a string, so we'll fix that up first.

instance_variable_set(new_var_name.to_sym, ["hi", "everyone"])

But the big issue is that instance_variable_set isn't being called by an instance of Foo, it's being called by the Foo class itself. So, an instance variable is being set, but not on what you expected.

Foo.instance_variable_get(:@crazy_var_name).inspect
# ["hi", "everyone"]
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