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I have a hash of arrays, as shown:

my %hash = (
  234 => ["aa", "bb", "aa", "ab", "aa"],
  235 => ["aa", "ab", "aa", "bb", "aa"],
  236 => ["bb", "aa", "aa", "aa", "bb"],
  ...
)

I am trying to go through each values's first element and count the number of occurrences of bb.

For example, in the hash above, I have one occurrence bb for all the first elements shown. I need to push that number (the number of "bb"s in the 0th element of all arrays) into a new array and then move to the next set of elements.

For the example above, I would loop through all 4 elements of the arrays and get a final array with (1, 1, 0, 1, 1).

I'm having a lot of trouble getting the code right and haven't yet found a similar question. Any help would be much appreciated.

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1  
It would be easier to understand your question if you showed what the data structure looks like using actual perl syntax. –  Alan Curry Jul 28 '12 at 23:46
    
Noted for next time, thanks to Borodin for editting! –  user1560292 Jul 29 '12 at 17:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A simple solution: iterate over the hash values. For each value, iterate over the members of the array and add 1 to a resulting array if needed:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

my %hash = (234 => [qw/aa bb aa ab aa/],
            235 => [qw/aa ab aa bb aa/],
            236 => [qw/bb aa aa aa bb/],
           );

my @result;

for my $value (values %hash) {
    my $i = 0;
    for (@$value) {
        $result[$i++] += 'bb' eq $_;
    }
}

print "@result\n";
share|improve this answer
1  
Oh so that is what it meant. Good answer; I wonder why you didn't just loop over values %hash though, since you didn't use the $key for anything besides getting the value. –  Alan Curry Jul 29 '12 at 0:11
    
@AlanCurry: Good point! Updated. –  choroba Jul 29 '12 at 0:13
2  
@choroba: Something I've just learned about Perl. I wouldn't have expected $result[$i++] += 'bb' eq $_ to get away without a runtime error but found this in perlop. The relational operators ... return 1 for true and a special version of the defined empty string, "", which counts as a zero but is exempt from warnings about improper numeric conversions –  Borodin Jul 29 '12 at 5:44
    
Thanks for the suggestion. –  user1560292 Jul 29 '12 at 19:10

The grep operator is the best tool for counting values in a list that match a certain condition. Just iterate over each entry of the list of hash values to get a count for each element.

This code assumes that each hash value array has the same length, and uses the length of the first element as the size for all of them.

use strict;
use warnings;

my %data = (
  234 => [ qw/aa bb aa ab aa/ ],
  235 => [ qw/aa ab aa bb aa/ ],
  236 => [ qw/bb aa aa aa bb/ ],
);

my @count_bb;
for my $i ( 0 .. $#{(values %data)[0]} ) {
  $count_bb[$i] = grep { $_->[$i] eq 'bb' } values %data;
} 

print "@count_bb\n";

output

1 1 0 1 1

This alternative will create a hash with the counts for every different value in the the hash value arrays. The first step initialises the hash to have the correct number of zeroes in each element, the second step increments the count for each value as it is encountered in the data, and the final loop prints the contents of the resulting %counts hash.

use strict;
use warnings;

my %data = (
  234 => [ qw/aa bb aa ab aa/ ],
  235 => [ qw/aa ab aa bb aa/ ],
  236 => [ qw/bb aa aa aa bb/ ],
);

my %counts;
$counts{$_} = [ (0) x @{(values %data)[0]} ] for map @$_, values %data;

for my $i ( 0 .. $#{(values %data)[0]} ) {
  $counts{$_}[$i]++ for map $_->[$i], values %data;
} 

while (my ($k, $v) = each %counts) {
    printf "%s => (%s)\n", $k, join ', ', @$v;
}

output

ab => (0, 1, 0, 1, 0)
bb => (1, 1, 0, 1, 1)
aa => (2, 1, 3, 1, 2)
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, the first method works well for me. I really appreciate the help. –  user1560292 Jul 29 '12 at 19:09
use Data::Dumper;

%hash = (234 => [aa, bb, aa, ab, aa],
         235 => [aa, ab, aa, bb, aa],
         236 => [bb, aa, aa, aa, bb],
        );

do { $i = 0; $element{$i++}->{$_}++ for @{$_}; } for (values %hash);

print Dumper(\%element);
share|improve this answer

This is a more perl-ish (not necessarily better) way of doing things. Unless those maintaining the code know perl well, it will be less clear. Nonetheless, it's not a bad idea to learn about map and grep. Once you're familiar with them, they can help make the intention of your code more clear. I'd suggest looking through each solution and try to figure out how each works.

This solution will handle arrays that are too short, though this may or may not be what you're looking for depending on the application.

use warnings;
use strict;

use Data::Dumper;

my %hash = (
    '234' => [qw(aa bb aa ab aa)],
    '235' => [qw(aa ab aa bb aa)],
    '236' => [qw(bb aa aa aa bb)],
);

my @result = ();

while ( grep {scalar @{$_}} values %hash ) {
    push @result, scalar @{[
        grep {$_ eq 'bb'}
            map {shift @{$_}}
                values %hash
    ]};
}

print Dumper \@result;
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