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Please help me find the match of:

    <ptext>Any Sentence/tags goes here</ptext> 

My current regex is:

    \<ptext\>\b.+\b\</ptext\>

But if I will double the for example:

<ptext>Any Sentence/tags goes here</ptext> <ptext>Any Sentence/tags goes here</ptext> 

My regex will match the ptext up to the last ptext

How can I separate that so I will match two(2) matches in the example I gave. Thanks for all your help.

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You need to specify that it should be non-greedy. –  Michael Graczyk Jul 29 '12 at 0:01
    
Can you use some kind of XML parser? –  Yuriy Faktorovich Jul 29 '12 at 0:01
    
No, it's for my assignment about regex so we can't use XML parser. thanks –  xxxXXX Jul 29 '12 at 0:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is where a single pair of ( ) and a .+? will come in handy. Try...

\<ptext\>\b(.+?)\b\</ptext\>

This does two things. First, the parentheses used by themselves, not to be confused with an OR statement (like|this), will return specifically within the parentheses, not necessarily everything. Second, the "lazy" .+? will match 1 or more characters until it comes to the FIRST match, not the last match, that works. That way, it should only catch each set of items and not the whole file.

Also not sure if the \b are right in your case, FYI. Thus, I would recommend...

\<ptext\>(.+?)\</ptext\>

For example, this code should return...

Array[0] = "This is a sentence"
Array[1] = "Here's another one."
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1  
thanks for that! This is the answer that I am looking for. Sorry for being a newbie. Sometimes my problem is so obvious. :) –  xxxXXX Jul 29 '12 at 0:12
    
That's okay. I've been writing RegEx for two years straight, so don't feel too bad...I didn't know much then, and I'm still learning. –  J-Law Jul 29 '12 at 0:13

Use a non-greedy quantifier:

<ptext>.+?</ptext>
share|improve this answer
    
that regex is the one I tried first but it matches 1 only, <ptext> up to the last </ptext> –  xxxXXX Jul 29 '12 at 0:05
1  
@jomskie19: No, it has a question mark after the plus. Trust me, it works... –  minitech Jul 29 '12 at 0:09

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