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I have a nodeJS server running. There are some requests that the server will receive that don't need a response (just updating in the server). If the update fails, it isn't something that the client will need to worry about. In order to save bandwidth, I'd like to not respond to said requests. Can not responding to requests somehow affect my server's performance?

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it might be good to add that in a past webapp that i was working on, I ignored many requests that were coming in. At some point after the server started running, however, it would stop responding to all requests. I don't know whether or not the lack of a response to certain requests is related to the problem that came about eventually, but I figure that there is a chance that this was indeed the case. –  thisissami Jul 29 '12 at 0:52

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Assuming you are using http, You have to at least return an http response code. If you don't you are violating http -- the client is going to wait for a response, and will die trying (i.e. will timeout after a while).

According to the documentation for end, you must call end for every response. That is going to send a response code for you, if you don't specify one. So yes, need to respond.

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are there any kind of http requests that don't need a response? POST perhaps? and what would happen if just called response.end() without specifying any data whatsoever? –  thisissami Jul 29 '12 at 1:48
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as i said, it will send a response code for you. The response is necessary. how is the client supposed to know when no more data is forthcoming? Really, you are over optimizing. Having to send the response code is not your problem. –  hvgotcodes Jul 29 '12 at 1:51
    
You can always send out a "204 No Content" code if the client isn't looking for an actual response. –  ebohlman Jul 29 '12 at 9:28

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