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How can I tally up the wins after the loop is done.

print 'PLAY ROCK PAPER SCISSORS'

for roundd in range(1,6):
    print 'Round: ' + str(roundd)
    human = raw_input('Whats your draw: ')
    from random import choice
    cpu = choice(('rock', 'paper', 'scissors'))

    if human == cpu:
        print 'CPU: ' + cpu
        print 'Draw'

    if cpu == 'rock' and human == 'scissors':
        print 'CPU: ' + cpu
        print 'You Lose'
    if cpu == 'scissors'and human == 'paper':
        print 'CPU: ' + cpu
        print 'You Lose'
    if cpu == 'paper'and human == 'rock':
        print 'CPU: ' + cpu
        print 'You Lose'

    if cpu == 'rock' and human == 'paper':
        print 'CPU: ' + cpu
        print 'You Win!'
    if cpu == 'scissors'and human == 'rock':
        print 'CPU: ' + cpu
        print 'You Win'
    if cpu == 'paper'and human == 'scissors':
        print 'CPU: ' + cpu
        print 'You Win'
share|improve this question
    
Using `\` like that looks bad and is considered bad practice according to PEP8 – jamylak Jul 29 '12 at 2:11
1  
too lazy to type out all the code, but just keep an integer for the cpu and one for the user, and if the cpu wins, cpu_score +=1, else increment the users – notbad.jpeg Jul 29 '12 at 2:11
1  
You need to validate your users' input. Right now, nothing useful happens if the users' input happens to be outside the set of "rock, paper, scissors"; you should inform the users (and allow them to select again, telling them what does constitute valid input) if they give you an unexpected choice. – atomicinf Jul 29 '12 at 2:15

@kaveman's answer is right. I'd just like to point out that you can make your code much more concise by using a dictionary and taking the repeated print 'CPU: ' + cpu line out of all the if statements.

This code also checks the user's input is valid, as suggested by @atomicinf. Otherwise, the code I wrote would count 'lol' as an automatic win. :) That's what the while loop below does: if the user types in an invalid move, it gives them an error message and asks them to try again until they do a valid one.

Here's code that makes that and some other changes, with some comments about why I did various things:

from random import choice # usually, imports go at the top; easier to manage

print 'PLAY ROCK PAPER SCISSORS'

# This dictionary associates a move to the move that it beats.
beats = {
    'rock': 'scissors',
    'paper': 'rock',
    'scissors': 'paper',
}
moves = ('rock', 'paper', 'scissors') # The tuple of all valid moves
# could also do moves = beats.keys()

draws = cpu_wins = human_wins = 0 # start our counter variables off at 0

for roundd in range(1,6):
    print 'Round: ' + str(roundd)
    human = raw_input("What's your draw: ")
    while human not in moves: # keep retrying if they gave a bad move...
        print "Invalid move '%s' - expected one of %s." % (human, ', '.join(moves))
        # this % formatting just replaces the %s with the variable on the left
        print "Try again!"
        human = raw_input("What's your draw: ")
    cpu = choice(moves)

    print 'CPU: ' + cpu # this happens every time, no need to retype it so many times :)

    if human == cpu:
        print 'Draw'
        draws += 1
    elif human == beats[cpu]:
        print 'You Lose'
        cpu_wins += 1
    else:
        print 'You Win'
        human_wins += 1

# done - print out the overall record
print "Your record: %s wins, %s losses, %s draws" % (human_wins, cpu_wins, draws)

Make sense?

share|improve this answer

You can keep track of a wins variables for both cpu and human, and increment each time a win is recorded. E.g.

human_wins = 0
cpu_wins = 0

for roundd in range(1,6):
    if cpu == 'paper'and\
       human == 'rock':
        cpu_wins += 1
        print 'CPU: ' + cpu
        print 'You Lose'

    if cpu == 'paper'and\
       human == 'scissors':
        human_wins += 1
        print 'CPU: ' + cpu
        print 'You Win'
    ...
share|improve this answer

Here is a cleaned-up version; may it be edifying:

import random

class RockPaperScissors(object):
    choices = ['rock', 'paper', 'scissors']

    def __init__(self):
        self.wins   = 0
        self.draws  = 0
        self.losses = 0

    def cpu(self):
        return random.choice(type(self).choices)

    def human(self):
        while True:
            res = raw_input("What's your draw: ").strip().lower()
            if res in type(self).choices:
                return res
            else:
                print('Enter one of {}'.format(', '.join(type(self).choices)))

    def win(self):
        print('You win!')
        self.wins += 1

    def draw(self):
        print('Draw')
        self.draws += 1

    def lose(self):
        print('You lose')
        self.losses += 1

    def play(self):
        """
        Play one hand
        """
        human = self.human()
        cpu   = self.cpu()
        print("Computer chose {}".format(cpu))
        val   = type(self).choices.index
        [self.draw, self.lose, self.win][(val(cpu) - val(human)) % 3]()

def main():
    print('PLAY ROCK PAPER SCISSORS')
    rps = RockPaperScissors()

    for rnd in xrange(1,6):
        print('Round: {}'.format(rnd))
        rps.play()

    print('Final tally: {} losses, {} draws, {} wins'.format(rps.losses, rps.draws, rps.wins))

if __name__=="__main__":
    main()
share|improve this answer
    
You could improve that by making 6 in the for rnd in xrange line a variable that gets fed when you call main, letting you choose the number of rounds. – TankorSmash Jul 29 '12 at 2:50
1  
I'd go with self.choices rather than RockPaperScissors.choices: briefer to type and more amenable to subclassing. Also, although the modular arithmetic indexing is cute, I don't know that it's really better than saying it explicitly. – Dougal Jul 29 '12 at 2:51
    
@Dougal: good point; I've used type(self) to refer to the class instead. – Hugh Bothwell Jul 29 '12 at 2:54

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