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I'm a bit new to c++ and am having a bit of trouble establishing why I am getting a segfault in the following code;

gamescene.h

#ifndef GAMESCENE_H
#define GAMESCENE_H

#include <QGraphicsScene>

class GameScene : public QGraphicsScene
{
    Q_OBJECT
public:
    explicit GameScene(QObject *parent = 0);
    virtual void keyPressEvent(QKeyEvent* );
    QGraphicsTextItem* p;
    ~GameScene();
signals:

public slots:

};

#endif // GAMESCENE_H

gamescene.cpp

#include "gamescene.h"
#include "QKeyEvent"
#include "QGraphicsTextItem"
#include "QGraphicsRectItem"
#include "QDebug"
#include "QGraphicsScene"
#include "QScopedPointer"


GameScene::GameScene(QObject *parent) :
    QGraphicsScene(parent)
{
    QGraphicsTextItem* p = new QGraphicsTextItem(QString("HEEEEE"));
    p->setFlags(p->ItemIsMovable);
    p->moveBy(qreal(500),qreal(500));
    addItem(p);
}

void GameScene::keyPressEvent(QKeyEvent *event)

{
    qDebug() << (p != NULL);
    switch(event->key())
    case ( Qt::Key_W ):
    {
        qreal x, y;
        x = qreal(5);
        y = qreal(5);
        p->moveBy(x,y);
        qDebug() << "move up";

    }

}
GameScene::~GameScene() {


}

Its happening when my gamescene object's keyPressEvent method is called and it attempts to access anything to do with the QGraphicsTextItem pointer, p.

I'm sure its obvious, but any help would be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
You should assign the parent of QGraphicsTextItem when it is constructed. This will mean that it gets deleted at an appropriate time. –  Andrew Tomazos Jul 29 '12 at 4:16
    
Correct me if I'm wrong or misunderstanding something, but I thought that when calling addItem, the scene takes ownership of the item. –  biokiwi Jul 29 '12 at 5:34
    
Yes, that is correct. However I would suggest it is still good practice to use the QObject(parent) constructor (by proxy from the subclass constructor) when the intended parent is in scope at construction time. –  Andrew Tomazos Jul 29 '12 at 6:54
    
With the QGraphicsTextItem object it doesn't appear possible to set the parent through the constructor, unless it is to be a child of another QGraphicsItem, unless I create it using the scene's addText method. Or is there something fundamental I'm missing here? –  biokiwi Jul 29 '12 at 11:05
    
I didn't notice that. It isn't clear to me why it takes a QGraphicsItem parent and not a QObject parent. Bizarre. –  Andrew Tomazos Jul 29 '12 at 12:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

OK, I know nothing about the library you are using but I suspect the error is here

GameScene::GameScene(QObject *parent) :
    QGraphicsScene(parent)
{
    QGraphicsTextItem* p = new QGraphicsTextItem(QString("HEEEEE"));
    p->setFlags(p->ItemIsMovable);
    p->moveBy(qreal(500),qreal(500));
    addItem(p);
}

should be

GameScene::GameScene(QObject *parent) :
    QGraphicsScene(parent)
{
    p = new QGraphicsTextItem(QString("HEEEEE"));
    p->setFlags(p->ItemIsMovable);
    p->moveBy(qreal(500),qreal(500));
    addItem(p);
}

Your keyPressEvent method tries to use a member variable called p, and it looks like you are trying to set that up in the constructor, but you aren't. All you have in your constructor is local variable also called p.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank's so much for that, was exactly what was going wrong. –  biokiwi Jul 29 '12 at 5:33
    
It's a good convention to always name class variables differently from normal variables by using a prefix. For instance some people say class X { int myVariable; };, some say class X { int m_Variable; };, personally I do it like this class X { int _variable; }; although people tell me off for that. In any case it's a good idea to have a clear distinction between names of class variables and normal variables to avoid confusion. –  jahhaj Jul 29 '12 at 5:44
    
@jahhaj: Identifiers starting with an underscore are reserved for the system (compiler and standard libraries). You risk a difficult to debug naming conflict by using them. –  Andrew Tomazos Jul 29 '12 at 6:52
    
I told you I get told off for this! Identifiers starting with an underscore are reserved for the compiler at file scope only. I'm not using them at file scope. –  jahhaj Jul 29 '12 at 6:59

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