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I've been trying for 2 days now to get this code to work. It's just been error after error.

Can anyone point out what i'm doing wrong?

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int h = 0;
    for(int a = 100; a<1000; a++)
        for(int b = 100; b<1000; b++)
            int c = a * b;
// Error: "c" is undefined
            if ((c == reverse(c)) && (c > h))
                h = c;
    cout << "The answer is: " << h << endl;
}

int reverse (int x)
{
// Error: "'itoa' : function does not take 1 arguments"
    string s = string(itoa(x));
    reverse(s.begin(), s.end());
  return (x);
}

Using std::to_string just gives me more errors as well.

share|improve this question
    
Listen to your compiler. It's telling you what the problem is. ...does not take 1 arguments..., that is telling you one of two things: 1. You're sending one argument to a function that doesn't take any arguments(highly unlikely in this situation), or 2. You're sending one argument when the function takes at least two, but could be n(Arg). If n=100 and you sent 99 it'd say `...function does not take 99 arguments'. –  Don'tWasteYourTime Jul 29 '12 at 4:45
    
..function does not take 99 arguments.... The same goes when you exceed it, saying the same thing! It will compile correctly when you send it the correct amount of arguments. –  Don'tWasteYourTime Jul 29 '12 at 4:51
    
By looking at your code further, and your continued frustration in comments to other answers, I would suggest that you utilize braces even when they're not "needed"! Especially if you get simple errors continually. When you can bust out code while watching Seinfield, then omit them. I use 'em like it's required! –  Don'tWasteYourTime Jul 29 '12 at 5:16
    
Perhaps you should ask about how to address the problems you were having with std::to_string, it's 14 times better than itoa, and standard. –  Benjamin Lindley Jul 29 '12 at 5:35
    
Just FYI: In a situation where you have one or more programmer(you) defined overloaded functions which accept n (+/-) x arguments you wouldn't get that error message, but could possibly get unexpected results. –  Don'tWasteYourTime Jul 29 '12 at 5:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When your compiler explains something to you in an error message, you should believe it. itoa does, in fact, take more than one argument, as you can see at the following link:

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdlib/itoa/

Edit: Oh and this is achievable using standard, C++-style code by the way (fixed a bit of code as per suggestion in the comments):

int reverse(int x)
{
    std::stringstream ss;
    ss << x;

    std::string s = ss.str();
    std::reverse(s.begin(), s.end());

    ss.clear();
    ss.str(s.c_str());

    ss >> x;

    return x;
}

Here. Not sure it's the cleanest solution but it works on my compiler.

Edit: Found out how to use only one stringstream here : How to clear stringstream?

share|improve this answer
    
"Error: no suitable user-defined conversion from "std::stringstream" to "std::string" exists" and a few more errors :/ –  Leinad177 Jul 29 '12 at 4:48
    
A working solution already exists in my answer. –  Luchian Grigore Jul 29 '12 at 4:52
    
@Leinad177 It's ss.str(). –  Luchian Grigore Jul 29 '12 at 4:53
    
@LuchianGrigore: I am not denying this though in fixing my own solution I did not want to copy yours. If people find yours better they can upvote it (it is indeed shorter). –  Alexandre P. Levasseur Jul 29 '12 at 4:56
2  
Again listen to compiler! Search the line the error references and look to see what might match the error msg. end of file found before left brace.. means exactly that. –  Don'tWasteYourTime Jul 29 '12 at 5:12

Can I suggest a different solution? Instead of doing int<->string conversions you can test to see if a number is a palindrome this way:

bool is_palindrome(int number, int base = 10)
{
    int rebmun = 0;
    for (int temp = number; temp != 0; temp /= base) {
        rebmun = (rebmun * base) + (temp % base);
    }
    return number == rebmun;
}

Then your test becomes:

if (is_palindrome(c) && (c > h))
share|improve this answer
    
Looks good, would you be able to explain it in more detail though? I don't really understand what it does, just that it works. –  Leinad177 Jul 29 '12 at 5:45
    
@Leinad177: The key idea is using temp % 10 to isolate the least siginificant digit of temp. Every step of the loop it multiplies rebmun by 10 to shift the value "left" and then adds the last digit from temp. Until temp becomes zero the digits are moved from temp to rebmun one at a time. Note the parameter base defaults to 10 for decimal numbers but you can pass 2 to test for binary (base 2) palindromes. This will come in hand for another Project Euler problem :) –  Blastfurnace Jul 29 '12 at 6:01

For the first problem, correct indentation might make it clear:

int h = 0;
for(int a = 100; a<1000; a++)
    for(int b = 100; b<1000; b++)
        int c = a * b;

if ((c == reverse(c)) && (c > h))
    h = c;

With some extra brackets:

int h = 0;
for(int a = 100; a<1000; a++)
{
    for(int b = 100; b<1000; b++)
    {
        int c = a * b;
        if ((c == reverse(c)) && (c > h))
            h = c;
    }
}

As for the itoa issue, its signature is:

char *  itoa ( int value, char * str, int base );

so you can't just write itoa(x) and expect it to return a string.

There are however better way to convert an int to a string in C++

  • if you have C++11, there std::to_string
  • otherwise, a std::stringstream will do the job.

Like so:

#include <sstream>

int reverse (int x)
{
    std::stringstream ss;
    ss << x;
    string s(ss.str());
    reverse(s.begin(), s.end());
    return (x);
}

Note that this won't return the int reversed though.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah okay, how would i go about making it return the int reversed? –  Leinad177 Jul 29 '12 at 4:52
    
@Leinad177 different question. –  Luchian Grigore Jul 29 '12 at 4:53
    
You're missing an std:: before string and before reverse and there are missing parentheses to the ss.str() function call. –  Alexandre P. Levasseur Jul 29 '12 at 4:57
    
@AlexandreP.Levasseur there's a using namespace std; at the begining of the file, so the qualification is not necessary. –  Luchian Grigore Jul 29 '12 at 4:59
    
Did not see that (though you are using std:: before stringstream :D ). –  Alexandre P. Levasseur Jul 29 '12 at 5:00

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