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So the compiler will not allow me to overrload the == and != operators of my class. Here is what the class looks like:

public class Item
{
    public string _name;
    public double _weight;
    public decimal _wholesalePrice;
    public int _quantity;

    public Item(string name, double weight, decimal wholesalePrice, int quantity)
    {
        _name = name;
        _weight = weight;
        _wholesalePrice = wholesalePrice;
        _quantity = quantity;
    }

    public static override bool operator ==(Item left, Item right)
    {
        if (left._name == right._name)
        {
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }

    public static override bool operator !=(Item left,Item right)
    {
        return !(left == right);
    }
}

The compiler keeps telling me "The modifier 'override' is not valid for this item. At first I thought I might not have declared a base method as virtual, but my class does is not derived. Any ideas what's happening?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You cannot declare an override unless you have derived the class from a parent class. You also cannot declare override on a static method. Have you tried removing override all together? That seems to work for me...

public class Item
{
    public string _name;
    public double _weight;
    public decimal _wholesalePrice;
    public int _quantity;

    public Item(string name, double weight, decimal wholesalePrice, int quantity)
    {
        _name = name;
        _weight = weight;
        _wholesalePrice = wholesalePrice;
        _quantity = quantity;
    }

    public static bool operator ==(Item left, Item right)
    {
        if (left._name == right._name)
        {
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }

    public static bool operator !=(Item left, Item right)
    {
        return !(left == right);
    }
}

As a side note, if you override the == and != operators, it's also good practice to override the GetHashCode and Equals methods.

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Fortunately, I overrode those methods below :) I just didn't include them. What exactly is the point of Equals anyhow? When would I use that instead of the == operator? –  Nick Jul 29 '12 at 15:15
    
The == operator usually compares object references, not the values within the objects. The Equals method is used more frequently than the == operator to compare the object's values. Most of the .NET classes (Dictionary, etc) use the Equals method to compare objects, so if you just overload the == operator, these classes will not always work as expected. –  Glen Hughes Jul 29 '12 at 17:58

You are deriving your class from the class Object, which does not have an == or != operator. So you cannot override those operators.

In addition, you cannot override a static operator or method, you can only override instance methods.

Finally, note that override and overload are two very different things. An overload is where you have multiple definitions of methods with the same name but different signatures (eg. different parameters).

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The short answer is that the syntax is public static bool operator ==(Item left, Item right) without the override keyword.

This is called operator overloading, not overriding.

You may think of == as a kind of static method (inside an imaginary "global" class) taking two parameters. When the compiler sees something like

xxx == yyy

it uses overload resolution to find out which == to use. This is analogous to

Meth(xxx, yyy)

where the compiler considers overloads like Meth(Object, Object), Meth(String, String), Meth(Item, Item) and finds out which of them (if any) fits best to the compile-time types of xxx and yyy.

This is just an anolgy, of course, but helps remembering why you include static and not override when you change the == operator.

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I take it then that it is not possible to override a static method? –  Nick Jul 29 '12 at 15:14
    
@user1556487 That's correct. A "normal" static method (operator overloads set aside) can't be virtual, and can't be overridden. They are still inherited, but saying BaseClass.MyStaticMethod() is always equivalent to DerivedClass.MyStaticMethod() (except if DerivedClass introduces a new method with the same name that hides the method on BassClass, but that's not related to overriding). –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jul 29 '12 at 16:58

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