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Because the lack of condition variable in windows(though it is introduced since vista, it's not supported in windows XP and 2003), it is not very easy to implement a thread-safe queue in c++. Strategies for Implementing POSIX Condition Variables on Win32. What I required is to just use CriticalSection or Mutex and Event without using semaphore and condition variable.

I also tried to find an exact implementation that just using win32 native API, but no luck. So I finished one by myself. The problem is I am not 100% sure the code is thread-safe. Who can tell me it is OK or not?

class CEventSyncQueue
{
public:
    CEventSyncQueue(int nCapacity = -1);
    virtual ~CEventSyncQueue();
    virtual void Put(void* ptr);
    virtual void* Get();
protected:
    int m_nCapacity;
    CPtrList m_list;

    CRITICAL_SECTION m_lock;    
    HANDLE m_hGetEvent;
    HANDLE m_hPutEvent;
};

CEventSyncQueue::CEventSyncQueue(int nCapacity)
{
    m_nCapacity = nCapacity;

    ::InitializeCriticalSection(&m_lock);
    m_hPutEvent = ::CreateEvent(NULL, FALSE, FALSE, NULL);
    m_hGetEvent = ::CreateEvent(NULL, FALSE, FALSE, NULL);
}

CEventSyncQueue::~CEventSyncQueue()
{
    m_list.RemoveAll();

    ::CloseHandle(m_hGetEvent);
    ::CloseHandle(m_hPutEvent);

    ::DeleteCriticalSection(&m_lock);
}

void CEventSyncQueue::Put(void* ptr)
{
    ::EnterCriticalSection(&m_lock);

    while(m_nCapacity > 0 && m_list.GetCount() >= m_nCapacity)
    {
        ::LeaveCriticalSection(&m_lock);

        //wait
        if(::WaitForSingleObject(m_hPutEvent, INFINITE) != WAIT_OBJECT_0)
        {
            ASSERT(FALSE);
        }

        ::EnterCriticalSection(&m_lock);
    }
    if(m_nCapacity > 0)
    {
        ASSERT(m_list.GetCount() < m_nCapacity);
    }
    m_list.AddTail(ptr);

    ::SetEvent(m_hGetEvent);    //notifyAll
    ::LeaveCriticalSection(&m_lock);
}
void* CEventSyncQueue::Get()
{
    ::EnterCriticalSection(&m_lock);

    while(m_list.IsEmpty())
    {
        ::LeaveCriticalSection(&m_lock);

        //wait
        if(::WaitForSingleObject(m_hGetEvent, INFINITE) != WAIT_OBJECT_0)
        {
            ASSERT(FALSE);
        }

        ::EnterCriticalSection(&m_lock);
    }
    ASSERT(!m_list.IsEmpty());
    void* ptr = m_list.RemoveHead();

    ::SetEvent(m_hPutEvent);    //notifyAll
    ::LeaveCriticalSection(&m_lock);

    return ptr;
}
share|improve this question
    
I notice that PostThreadMessage is one of the allowed functions. Assuming your waveOutProc function is only adding items to a queue, not removing them, this might be a simpler approach. –  Harry Johnston Jul 29 '12 at 20:04
    
Yes, PostThreadMessage is allowed. But this will require a new thread to receive and process messages, that makes things more complex. Why I asked this problem here is I want to clarify what events can do and what not. It's not the point how to solve the problems in waveOutProc. –  gelu Jul 30 '12 at 2:25
    
@gelu - your event-based P-C queue, (if it works), will require a new thread to receive and process messages from your queue. A PostMessage()/PostThreadMessage() comms system needs a while loop and GetMessage() - how simple can you get? 'It's not the point how to solve the problems in waveOutProc' - your posts are getting a bit circular now. Again - events are not an appropriate synchro primitive for building producer-consumer queues, (except some exotic ones where the specific consumer thread to run has to be chosen). –  Martin James Jul 30 '12 at 2:50
    
Yes, I agree with you. Events are not the appropriate way to P-C queues. I am now sure that the code I pasted is incorrect. It will cause deadlock when there are more than 2 P threads or 2 C threads. It seems difficult (may be impossible) to implement P-C queue with only events. –  gelu Jul 30 '12 at 5:27
    
Oh, I'm sure it's possible to do this with just events and critical sections, it's just difficult to get right - and even more difficult to be certain you've got it right. One approach would be to use them to implement your own semaphore. –  Harry Johnston Jul 30 '12 at 20:00
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

On second thoughts, it's hardly necessary to explicitly implement a semaphore. Instead, just think about how you would implement a semaphore using events, and approach your the problem that way. My first attempt used manual-reset events, which was inefficient but manifestly correct, and then I optimized.

Please note that I haven't debugged (or even compiled!) either of these code fragments, but they should give you the right idea. Here's the manual-reset version:

class CEventSyncQueue
{
public:
    CEventSyncQueue(int nCapacity = -1);
    virtual ~CEventSyncQueue();
    virtual void Put(void* ptr);
    virtual void* Get();
protected:
    int m_nCapacity;
    CPtrList m_list;

    CRITICAL_SECTION m_lock;    
    HANDLE m_queue_not_empty;
    HANDLE m_queue_not_full;
};

CEventSyncQueue::CEventSyncQueue(int nCapacity)
{
    m_nCapacity = nCapacity;
    ::InitializeCriticalSection(&m_lock);
    m_queue_not_empty = ::CreateEvent(NULL, TRUE, FALSE, NULL);
    m_queue_not_full = ::CreateEvent(NULL, TRUE, TRUE, NULL);
}

CEventSyncQueue::~CEventSyncQueue()
{
    m_list.RemoveAll();
    ::CloseHandle(m_queue_not_empty);
    ::CloseHandle(m_queue_not_full);
    ::DeleteCriticalSection(&m_lock);
}

void CEventSyncQueue::Put(void* ptr)
{
    bool done = false;
    while (!done)
    {
        // If the queue is full, we must wait until it isn't.
        if(::WaitForSingleObject(m_queue_not_full, INFINITE) != WAIT_OBJECT_0)
        {
            ASSERT(FALSE);
        }

        // However, we might not be the first to respond to the event,
        // so we still need to check whether the queue is full and loop
        // if it is.
        ::EnterCriticalSection(&m_lock);
        if (m_nCapacity <= 0 || m_list.GetCount() < m_nCapacity)
        {
            m_list.AddTail(ptr);
            done = true;
            // The queue is definitely not empty.
            SetEvent(m_queue_not_empty);
            // Check whether the queue is now full.
            if (m_nCapacity > 0 && m_list.GetCount() >= m_nCapacity)
            {
                ResetEvent(m_queue_not_full);
            }
        }
        ::LeaveCriticalSection(&m_lock);
    }
}

void* CEventSyncQueue::Get()
{
    void *result = nullptr;
    while (result == nullptr)
    {
        // If the queue is empty, we must wait until it isn't.
        if(::WaitForSingleObject(m_queue_not_empty, INFINITE) != WAIT_OBJECT_0)
        {
            ASSERT(FALSE);
        }

        // However, we might not be the first to respond to the event,
        // so we still need to check whether the queue is empty and loop
        // if it is.
        ::EnterCriticalSection(&m_lock);
        if (!m_list.IsEmpty())
        {
            result = m_list.RemoveHead();
            ASSERT(result != nullptr);
            // The queue shouldn't be full at this point!
            ASSERT(m_nCapacity <= 0 || m_list.GetCount() < m_nCapacity);
            SetEvent(m_queue_not_full);
            // Check whether the queue is now empty.
            if (m_list.IsEmpty())
            {
                ResetEvent(m_queue_not_empty);
            }
        }
        ::LeaveCriticalSection(&m_lock);
    }
}

And here's the more efficient, auto-reset events version:

class CEventSyncQueue
{
public:
    CEventSyncQueue(int nCapacity = -1);
    virtual ~CEventSyncQueue();
    virtual void Put(void* ptr);
    virtual void* Get();
protected:
    int m_nCapacity;
    CPtrList m_list;

    CRITICAL_SECTION m_lock;    
    HANDLE m_queue_not_empty;
    HANDLE m_queue_not_full;
};

CEventSyncQueue::CEventSyncQueue(int nCapacity)
{
    m_nCapacity = nCapacity;
    ::InitializeCriticalSection(&m_lock);
    m_queue_not_empty = ::CreateEvent(NULL, FALSE, FALSE, NULL);
    m_queue_not_full = ::CreateEvent(NULL, FALSE, TRUE, NULL);
}

CEventSyncQueue::~CEventSyncQueue()
{
    m_list.RemoveAll();
    ::CloseHandle(m_queue_not_empty);
    ::CloseHandle(m_queue_not_full);
    ::DeleteCriticalSection(&m_lock);
}

void CEventSyncQueue::Put(void* ptr)
{
    if (m_nCapacity <= 0)
    {
        ::EnterCriticalSection(&m_lock);
        m_list.AddTail(ptr);
        SetEvent(m_queue_not_empty);
        ::LeaveCriticalSection(&m_lock);
        return;
    }

    bool done = false;
    while (!done)
    {
        // If the queue is full, we must wait until it isn't.
        if(::WaitForSingleObject(m_queue_not_full, INFINITE) != WAIT_OBJECT_0)
        {
            ASSERT(FALSE);
        }

        // However, under some (rare) conditions we'll get here and find
        // the queue is already full again, so be prepared to loop.
        ::EnterCriticalSection(&m_lock);
        if (m_list.GetCount() < m_nCapacity)
        {
            m_list.AddTail(ptr);
            done = true;
            SetEvent(m_queue_not_empty);
            if (m_list.GetCount() < m_nCapacity)
            {
                SetEvent(m_queue_not_full);
            }
        }
        ::LeaveCriticalSection(&m_lock);
    }
}

void* CEventSyncQueue::Get()
{
    void *result = nullptr;
    while (result == nullptr)
    {
        // If the queue is empty, we must wait until it isn't.
        if(::WaitForSingleObject(m_queue_not_empty, INFINITE) != WAIT_OBJECT_0)
        {
            ASSERT(FALSE);
        }

        // However, under some (rare) conditions we'll get here and find
        // the queue is already empty again, so be prepared to loop.
        ::EnterCriticalSection(&m_lock);
        if (!m_list.IsEmpty())
        {
            result = m_list.RemoveHead();
            ASSERT(result != nullptr);
            // The queue shouldn't be full at this point!
            if (m_nCapacity <= 0) ASSERT(m_list.GetCount() < m_nCapacity);
            SetEvent(m_queue_not_full);
            if (!m_list.IsEmpty())
            {
                SetEvent(m_queue_not_empty);
            }
        }
        ::LeaveCriticalSection(&m_lock);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Great! Thank you Harry. After reading your code several times, I can't find any deadlock issue. You have show me a very good usage of event. Excellent! –  gelu Aug 1 '12 at 3:09
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It's trivial to implement a thread-safe queue in Windows. I've done it in Delphi, C++, BCB etc.

Why do you think that a condition variable is required? How do you think that Windows Message Queues work?

Events are the wrong primitive to use for P-C queues. Easiest/clearest way is to use a semaphore.

Simple unbounded producer-consumer queue.

template <typename T> class PCSqueue{
    CRITICAL_SECTION access;
    deque<T> *objectQueue;
    HANDLE queueSema;
public:
    PCSqueue(){
        objectQueue=new deque<T>;
        InitializeCriticalSection(&access);
        queueSema=CreateSemaphore(NULL,0,MAXINT,NULL);
    };
    void push(T ref){
        EnterCriticalSection(&access);
        objectQueue->push_front(ref);
        LeaveCriticalSection(&access);
        ReleaseSemaphore(queueSema,1,NULL);
    };
    bool pop(T *ref,DWORD timeout){
        if (WAIT_OBJECT_0==WaitForSingleObject(queueSema,timeout)) {
            EnterCriticalSection(&access);
            *ref=objectQueue->back();
            objectQueue->pop_back();
            LeaveCriticalSection(&access);
            return(true);
        }
        else
            return(false);
    };
};

Edit - a bounded queue would not be much more difficult - you need another semaphre to count the empty spaces. I don't use bounded queues, but I'm sure it would be OK - a bounded queue with 2 semaphores and a mutex/CS is s standard pattern.

Edit: Use PostMessage() or PostThreadMessage() API calls - they are explicitly declared to be safe from the 'waveOutProc' callback. MSDN says that calling 'other wave functions' will cause deadlock - semaphore calls are not in that set and I would be very surprised indeed if SetEvent() was allowed but ReleaseSemaphore() was not. In fact, I would be surprised if SetEvent() was allowed while ReleaseSemaphore() was not ANYWHERE in Windows.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your comments. I agree with you. I apologize for missing a pre-condition for this question. What I required should be implementing a thread-safe queue with Event and CriticalSection or Mutext API. A Semaphore is not allowed to use. I just wonder if there's no semaphore and condition variable support, is it possible to implement such a class in native Win32 API. Thanks –  gelu Jul 29 '12 at 9:11
3  
Why can't you use a semaphore? –  Harry Johnston Jul 29 '12 at 9:47
    
Apart from @HarryJohnston comment, I have little confidence that a bounded queue using events is 100% safe with multiple producers/consumers. I would have to test it and I have no incentive to do so since using a semaphore is simpler and will cetainly work. Windows has had native API semaphore support since W95. The 'CreateSemaphore()' etc. calls in my example are easily found on MSDN. –  Martin James Jul 29 '12 at 10:12
    
The import of Harrys' question has just hit me - OP, please say that you are not using the skilled and experienced developers on SO to debug your homework assignment? If so, you are not doing yourself any favours. Also, again, events are the wrong primitive to use for this purpose - tell your tutor/prof to see me after school. –  Martin James Jul 29 '12 at 10:41
    
In one of my project, I need to use the callback function waveOutProc defined by MS. In the callback function some synchronization is needed. MS said this function can't use semaphore else deadlock will occur, but SetEvent is allowed. This case makes this question come out. –  gelu Jul 29 '12 at 12:43
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condition variable? Do you mean Interlocked* functions? These have been around for a long time - I used them in Windows 2000. you can use them to build a concurrency system, but you'll still have to do a bit of work yourself.

Alternatively, try OpenMP. To use this you'll need Visual Studio 2008 or greater.

share|improve this answer
    
A condition (short for ‘‘condition variable’’) is a synchronization device that allows threads to suspend execution and relinquish the processors until some predicate on shared data is satisfied. The basic operations on conditions are: signal the condition (when the predicate becomes true), and wait for the condition, suspending the thread execution until another thread signals the condition. –  gelu Jul 30 '12 at 2:13
    
condition variable –  gelu Jul 30 '12 at 2:13
    
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