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allow me to preface this by saying that i am learning python on my own as part of my own curiosity, and i was recommended a free online computer science course that is publicly available, so i apologize if i am using terms incorrectly.

i have seen questions regarding this particular problem on here before - but i have a separate question from them and did not want to hijack those threads. the question:

"a substring is any consecutive sequence of characters inside another string. The same substring may occur several times inside the same string: for example "assesses" has the substring "sses" 2 times, and "trans-Panamanian banana" has the substring "an" 6 times. Write a program that takes two lines of input, we call the first needle and the second haystack. Print the number of times that needle occurs as a substring of haystack."

my solution (which works) is:

first = str(input())
second = str(input())

count = 0
location = 0
while location < len(second):
   if location == 0:
      location = str.find(second,first,0)
      if location < 0:
         break
      count = count + 1                          
   location = str.find(second,first,location +1)   
   if location < 0:
      break
   count = count + 1
print(count)

if you notice, i have on two separate occasions made the if statement that if location is less than 0, to break. is there some way to make this a 'global' condition so i do not have repetitive code? i imagine efficiency becomes paramount with increasing program sophistication so i am trying to develop good practice now.

how would python gurus optimize this code or am i just being too nitpicky?

share|improve this question
    
There's nothing wrong with breaking at two separate junctions. –  Joel Cornett Jul 29 '12 at 6:40
    
That being said, an easy way to do a complete loop exit is to encapsulate your code in a function and use return. –  Joel Cornett Jul 29 '12 at 6:43

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Check out regular expressions, python's re module (http://docs.python.org/library/re.html). For example,

import re
first = str(input())
second = str(input())
regex = first[:-1] + '(?=' + first[-1] + ')'
print(len(re.findall(regex, second)))
share|improve this answer
    
While regular expressions are usually good, the findall method is not right for this problem. Try your code with the "assesses" example and it will only see one match. The reason is that some of the matches may be overlapping, which regular expressions usually don't allow. –  Blckknght Jul 29 '12 at 7:14
    
@Blckknght Good call. I'll edit it to include a lookahead (though that's a little hack-y). –  Matthew Adams Jul 29 '12 at 7:24
    
To clarify what these comments are about for future readers, my original answer effectively had regex=first instead of the current regex, which led to the issue that Blckknght pointed out. –  Matthew Adams Jul 29 '12 at 7:36

Answer

needle=input()
haystack=input()
counter=0
for i in range(0,len(haystack)):
  if(haystack[i:len(needle)+i]!=needle):
     continue
  counter=counter+1
print(counter)
share|improve this answer

Here you go :

first = str(input())
second = str(input())
x=len(first)
counter=0
for i in range(0,len(second)):
   if first==second[i:(x+i)]:
      counter=counter+1
print(counter)
share|improve this answer
needle = "ss"
haystack = "ssi lass 2 vecess estan ss."

print 'needle occurs %d times in haystack.' % haystack.count(needle)
share|improve this answer

even your aproach could be imo simplified (which uses the fact, that find returns -1, while you aks it to search from non existent offset):

>>> x = 'xoxoxo'
>>> start = x.find('o')
>>> indexes = []
>>> while start > -1:
...     indexes.append(start)
...     start = x.find('o',start+1)
>>> indexes
[1, 3, 5]
share|improve this answer

I think Matthew and darshan have the best solution. I will just post a variation which is based on your solution:

first = str(input())
second = str(input())  

def count_needle(first, second):

        location = str.find(second,first)
        if location == -1:
                return 0 # none whatsoever
        else:
                count = 1
                while location < len(second):
                   location = str.find(second,first,location +1)   
                   if location < 0:
                      break
                   count = count + 1
        return count

print(count_needle(first, second))

Idea:

  • use function to structure the code when appropriate
  • initialise the variable location before entering the while loop save you from checking location < 0 multiple times
share|improve this answer

As mentioned by Matthew Adams the best way to do it is using python'd re module Python re module.

For your case the solution would look something like this:

import re

def find_needle_in_heystack(needle, heystack):
  return len(re.findall(needle, heystack))

Since you are learning python, best way would be to use 'DRY' [Don't Repeat Yourself] mantra. There are lots of python utilities that you can use for many similar situation.

For a quick overview of few very important python modules you can go through this class:

Google Python Class

which should only take you a day.

share|improve this answer
    
As I mentioned on Matthew Adams' answer, findall won't work for overlapping matches. –  Blckknght Jul 29 '12 at 7:15

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