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Consider the following code example:

{-# LANGUAGE FlexibleInstances #-}
{-# LANGUAGE UndecidableInstances #-} -- Is there a way to avoid this?

-- A generic class with a generic function.
class Foo a where
  foo :: a -> a

-- A specific class with specific functions.
class Bar a where
  bar :: a -> a
  baz :: a -> a

-- Given the specific class functions, we can implement the generic class function.
instance Bar a => Foo a where
  foo = bar . baz

-- So if a type belongs to the specific class...
instance Bar String where
  bar = id
  baz = id

-- We can invoke the generic function on it.
main :: IO ()
main =
  putStrLn (foo "bar")

(My actual code is way more elaborate; this is a minimal boiled-down case to demonstrate the pattern.)

It isn't clear to me why UndecidableInstances are needed here - the type parameter a appears once in both sides of the Bar a => Foo a, so I expected things to "just work". I'm obviously missing something here. But at any rate, is there a way to do this without using UndecidableInstances?

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2  
By declaring the instance Bar a => Foo a you have introduced an instance for every a - the context Bar a is not used in instance selection - though if you have overlapping instances GHC will find the most specific one on a per module basis. –  stephen tetley Jul 29 '12 at 6:42
    
That's... counter intuitive :-) Is there a way around it? I assume that "finding the most specific instance" is what UndecidableInstances will try to do, but in my code it fails miserably. –  Oren Ben-Kiki Jul 29 '12 at 7:33
    
Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/3213490 –  sdcvvc Jul 29 '12 at 9:40
1  
Incorrect. This option allows instance declarations, that may cause GHC typechecker to search solution infinitely. –  permeakra Jul 29 '12 at 10:59
1  
@user1509849 - indeed. I should have said "if you have overlapping instances GHC will search for the most specific one on a per module basis". –  stephen tetley Jul 29 '12 at 11:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

There are a few approaches you can take; I don't think you've provided enough context to determine which would be the most appropriate. If you're using GHC-7.4, you might want to try the DefaultSignatures extension.

{-# LANGUAGE FlexibleInstances #-}
{-# LANGUAGE DefaultSignatures #-}

-- A generic class with a generic function.
class Foo a where
  foo :: a -> a
  default foo :: Bar a => a -> a
  foo = bar . baz

-- A specific class with specific functions.
class Bar a where
  bar :: a -> a
  baz :: a -> a

instance Bar String where
  bar = id
  baz = id

instance Foo String

main :: IO ()
main =
  putStrLn (foo "bar")

You still need to declare that a type is an instance of Foo, but you don't need to repeat the method declaration because the default implementation will be used.

Another fairly lightweight approach is to use a newtype. If you have functions that need a Foo instance, you can wrap a Bar instance in the newtype.

newtype FooBar a = FooBar { unFooBar :: a }

instance Bar a => Foo (FooBar a) where
    foo = FooBar . bar . baz . unFooBar

-- imported from a library or something...
needsFoo :: Foo a => a -> b

myFunc = needsFoo (FooBar someBar)

Alternatively, you may be able to get by with replacing foo with a normal function, or making a specialized version for Bar instances:

-- if every `Foo` is also a `Bar`, you can just do this.  No need for `Foo` at all!
foo :: Bar a => a -> a
foo = bar . baz

-- if most `Foo`s aren't `Bar`s, you may be able to use this function when you have a `Bar`
fooBar :: Bar a => a -> a
foo = bar . baz

These are probably the best solutions if they work for your situation.

Another option is to declare every Foo instance manually. Although there may be a lot of different conceivable instances, it's fairly common for codebases to only have a handful of instances that are actually used. If that's true here, it's probably less work to just write out the 3 or 4 instances you need rather than try to implement a more general solution.

As a very last resort, you can use something like your original code, but you'll also need OverlappingInstances to make it work (if you don't need OverlappingInstances, then you don't need a Foo class). This is the extension that allows GHC to choose the "most specific instance" when there are multiple available matches. This will more or less work, although you may not get what you expect.

class Foo a where
  foo :: a -> a

class Bar a where
  bar :: a -> a
  baz :: a -> a

instance Bar String where
  bar = id
  baz = id

instance Bar a => Foo a where
  foo = bar . baz

instance Foo [a] where
  foo _ = []

main :: IO ()
main =
  print (foo "foo")

Now main prints an empty string. There are two Foo instances, for a and [a]. The latter is more specific, so it gets chosen for foo "foo" since a string has type [Char], although you probably wanted the former. So now you'd also need to write

instance Foo String where
  foo = bar . baz

at which point you may as well leave out the Bar a => Foo a instance entirely.

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Wow, thanks for the detailed answer! DefaultSignatures will not work for me because they require declaring the default in the generic class, and I want people to be able to freely define new specific classes. The newtype approach might work for me, I'll need to adapt it to my more complex case though. Just using functions wouldn't work for me... OverlappingInstances might also work, as in my case there's little chance of overlaps of the kind you describe. If it works, it would be best because it is the least intrusive. Thanks again! –  Oren Ben-Kiki Jul 29 '12 at 11:19
    
@OrenBen-Kiki - I cannot conceive of any way that a default signature would restrict further usage of Foo, whether it involves instances, subclasses, or using the foo method in otherwise unrelated functions. It's very unclear exactly what you're trying to model here, but I suspect you're trying to set up an OOP-style hierarchy with type classes. If so, I'd suggest you ask another question on SO asking for suggestions on modelling your problem in Haskell. –  John L Jul 29 '12 at 13:06
    
Also a word of warning. If you do decide to go the OverlappingInstances route, at some point GHC may complain that it needs IncoherentInstances enabled. Don't do it, it won't help. –  John L Jul 29 '12 at 13:13

In addition to answer above. Politics used in Data.Traversable module from base library is attractive. In short, giving generic instance in library forces end user to accept your decision, and this is not always the best thing to do. Data.Traversable contains functions like foldMapDefault, which gives default implementation, but decision of specific implementation is still up to user.

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