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Here's my question.

Let's say I have a class called WebServiceBase.h. And I need to add a iVar in to that class called NSString *requestData. But I don't need to add that iVar in to the header file and make it visible to the external people. (If I'm distributing this as a class library)

Also I need to be able to access this requestData iVar, within the other classes that is extended from the WebServiceBase.h. (These extended classes are written by me. Not from the external people)

I tried with declaring the requestData iVar within the class extensions. But then it's not visible to the extended classes.

Any solution for this? I need to protect my data and make it hide from the external world.

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Welcome to Objective-C. Your stuff isn't private. People can get at it :( –  Nate Jul 29 '12 at 13:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can define your ivars as protected via the @protected keyword, meaning that your class and all subclasses can access it without any problem, but the compiler won't allow this for other classes which don't inherit from your base class:

@interface Foo : NSObject
{
@protected
    NSObject *a;
}

Its as simple as that and already gives you all the safety you can get from Objective-C.

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You can still access it, for example KVC works by default on them. And then you also have the runtime if KVC is disabled for this ivar... Objective-C doesn't really allow private ivars, properties or methods, its that simple. –  JustSid Jul 29 '12 at 8:00
    
Dear Steven, You are 100% correct. We can't use those iVars in sub classes. If I declare those as properties anyone can change those property values unless I declare them as readonly. I need to protect my data. And also If I declare them in the .h file anyone can see my iVars and have an idea about the class structure. Which I dont want to. –  Charith Nidarsha Jul 29 '12 at 8:04
    
As we know If i declare like this in .m file @synthesize requestData = _requestData this will generate a iVar called _requestData.(BTW This is the default behavior which is going to be in Xcode 4.5). In this case also _requestData iVar is not visible in the sub classes. –  Charith Nidarsha Jul 29 '12 at 8:08
2  
@charith Like I already said; Its still accesible via KVC, but not only to your subclasses but to everyone. You can't hide ivars, not even if you put them into the implementation! You shouldn't use KVC for this because it doesn't solve your problem and just adds overhead, instead just declare your ivar as @ protected in your interface which will at least give you compile time protection and there is nothing more you can achieve in Objective-C anyway. –  JustSid Jul 29 '12 at 8:11
    
@charith Another way would be a property in you .m file and then a private category in your subclass. But I can't stress enough that this doesn't solve your runtime problem, which simply isn't possible to solve! –  JustSid Jul 29 '12 at 8:13

You can have an ivar definition block in the @implementation block.

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Yes. But How can I declare memory management semantics? If Im running under ARC then how the compiler handle memory for the iVar NSString *requestData? –  Charith Nidarsha Jul 29 '12 at 7:36
    
It just does. You don't need to do anything. Unless you want it weak, in which case you use __weak. –  Steven Fisher Jul 29 '12 at 7:50
1  
dear ranReloaded and Steven, I checked again. If I declare an iVar within the @implementation block then I can't use that iVar within the other extended classes from that class. Appreciate your feedback to achieve this. –  Charith Nidarsha Jul 29 '12 at 7:58
    
That is correct. So you want to hide the ivars from everyone except the subclasses? I think you can't achieve just that... –  NicolasMiari Jul 29 '12 at 10:52

there are 2 ways , you can choose one you like.

    1).h file
    @interface YourClass
    {
    }

    .m file
    @interface YourClass ()
    @property (nonatomic, retain) NSString *title;
    @end

    @implementation YourClass

    @synthesize title;

    //your method


    2) .h flie 
    @interface YourClass
    {
    }

    .m file
    @implementation YourClass  
    {  
        NSString *title;   
    }  

//your method
share|improve this answer
    
Dear cloosen, If we implement your solution 1 and 2, then I can't use the title iVar in my other extended classes. I should be able to use the title in my extended classes. –  Charith Nidarsha Jul 29 '12 at 7:55
    
@charith I am sorry , i forgot you want to use in your extended classes. So please use method 1. –  cloosen Jul 29 '12 at 7:59
    
@charith i search an answer maybe can help you , look at this stackoverflow.com/questions/6659383/protected-in-objective-c –  cloosen Jul 29 '12 at 8:06

Declare a class extension that defines the ivar in another .h file. Call it something like myclass-private.h. Then import that header in both your main class your subclasses.

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That doesn't really do what he/she's asking. Other classes can still just as easily import myclass-private.h. Putting private in the name doesn't make it private :). Also, they want to hide things in their library from reverse engineering, which this also doesn't do. –  Nate Jul 29 '12 at 13:30
    
I was assuming you didn't distribute that header file with your library. You can import it in subclasses you write yourself in your library, and then just not release that header. Sure, it isn't actual protection, but it's the best you're going to get in obj-C! –  Amy Worrall Jul 29 '12 at 22:37

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