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Whats the difference between or and OrElse?

if temp is dbnull.value or temp = 0

produces the error *Operator '=' is not defined for type 'DBNull' and type 'Integer'.**

while this one works like a charm!

if temp is dbnull.value OrElse temp = 0
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5 Answers 5

up vote 53 down vote accepted

OrElse is a short-circuiting operator, Or is not.

By the definition of the boolean 'or' operator, if the first term is True then the whole is definitely true - so we don't need to evaluate the second term.

OrElse knows this, so doesn't try and evaluate temp = 0 once it's established that temp Is DBNull.Value

Or doesn't know this, and will always attempt to evaluate both terms. When temp Is DBNull.Value, it can't be compared to zero, so it falls over.

You should use... well, whichever one makes sense.

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2  
So Or only makes sense when I call a function after the or that has side effects my code depends on? –  malach Jul 23 '09 at 10:09
    
Or makes sense in all cases where the second item does not trigger error if the first one is true... –  awe Jul 23 '09 at 10:16
3  
@ malach: I suppose so (you really get OrElse behaviour as default in most other languages): It's not a good idea to call functions with side effects in compound conditionals it makes the code unreadable. –  Utaal Jul 23 '09 at 10:16
3  
@ awe: yeah, but why do you even want to waste time evaluating something which by definition won't change the result of the expression? –  Utaal Jul 23 '09 at 10:18
1  
@MarkJ: How is OrElse less readable than Or? I just use OrElse and AndAlso by default. In the places where execution speed does matter (happens often, for exemple conditions checked inside a long loop), you use the good operator without even thinking about it. –  Meta-Knight Jul 23 '09 at 12:11

This is the same behaviour as with C#, where everyone uses the Coditional Or (||) and the Conditional And (&&), where you also have the normal Or (|) and normal And (&). So comparing C# to VB.Net is:

| => Or

|| => OrElse

& => And

&& => AndAlso

The condifitonal boolean operators are very usefull preventing nested if constructions. But sometimes the normal boolean operators are needed to ensure hitting both code paths.

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I never actually knew this was available. Thanks for new information. Good to know, even though I can't really see any situation in which I would want to use "|". I think it would require the second condition to cause side-effects to make any sense, and that in itself makes little sense in my opinion! ;) –  Kjartan Aug 13 '12 at 13:20

OrElse is short circuited, this means that only one side of the expression will be tested if the first side is a match.

Just like AndAlso will only test one side of the expression if the first half is a fail.

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(I've looked at other answers and realized I was terribly wrong)

The OrElse operator "performs short-circuiting logical disjunction on two expressions", that is to say: if the left operand is true and so the entire expression is guaranteed to be true the right operand won't even be evaluated (this is useful in cases like:

string a;
//...
if (a is null) or (a = "Hi") //...

to avoid a NullReferenceException throw by the right-hand operand.

I'm sincerely astonished that this (lazy evaluation) isn't the default behaviour of or and and as it is in C/C++ and C# (and many other languages...)

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3  
The thing is, in VB classic, there was just And and Or, which were non-short-circuiting. I think I'm right in saying that the first betas of VB.NET actually changed the behaviour of these operators - there was uproar, so they were changed back and AndAlso and OrElse (short-circuiting) were introduced. I can only imagine the alternative names they must have considered if these were the ones that were the best... –  AakashM Jul 23 '09 at 10:20
1  
By providing Or and OrElse (| and || in C#) this allows the developer to choose how they handle their own code. Using the code above, I'd have to use a try catch around it to handle a null value in the variable a. OrElse allows the developer to handle this in the else of the if statement as a known possible outcome rather than an exception. This is more obvious if the variable a was a parameter in a method, where you have less control over when the variable is assigned a value (i.e. outside the method) –  Kevin Hogg Mar 22 '12 at 14:54

The Bert' s answer is not very accurate. The '|' or '&' is logical operator, in C #, it always treat as bit operator, please see the following code as example

        static void Main()
        {
            object a = null;
            int b = 3;
            if (a == null | a.ToString() == "sdffd")
            {
                Console.WriteLine("dddd");
            }
            Console.WriteLine(b | b);
            Console.Read();
        }

The following is IL

    .method private hidebysig static void  Main() cil managed
{
  .entrypoint
  // Code size       62 (0x3e)
  .maxstack  3
  .locals init ([0] object a,
           [1] int32 b,
           [2] bool CS$4$0000)
   IL_0000:  nop
   IL_0001:  ldnull
   IL_0002:  stloc.0
   IL_0003:  ldc.i4.3
   IL_0004:  stloc.1
   IL_0005:  ldloc.0
   IL_0006:  ldnull
   IL_0007:  ceq
   IL_0009:  ldloc.0
   IL_000a:  callvirt   instance string [mscorlib]System.Object::ToString()
   IL_000f:  ldstr      "sdffd"
   IL_0014:  call       bool [mscorlib]System.String::op_Equality(string,
                                                                 string)
   IL_0019:  or
   IL_001a:  ldc.i4.0
   IL_001b:  ceq
   IL_001d:  stloc.2
   IL_001e:  ldloc.2
   IL_001f:  brtrue.s   IL_002e
   IL_0021:  nop
   IL_0022:  ldstr      "dddd"
   IL_0027:  call       void [mscorlib]System.Console::WriteLine(string)
   IL_002c:  nop
   IL_002d:  nop
   IL_002e:  ldloc.1
   IL_002f:  ldloc.1
   IL_0030:  or
   IL_0031:  call       void [mscorlib]System.Console::WriteLine(int32)
   IL_0036:  nop
   IL_0037:  call       int32 [mscorlib]System.Console::Read()
   IL_003c:  pop
   IL_003d:  ret
    } // end of method Program::Main

when you use || to test "a == null" and "a.ToString() == "sdffd", the IL will be

 .method private hidebysig static void  Main() cil managed
{
  .entrypoint
  // Code size       63 (0x3f)
  .maxstack  2
  .locals init ([0] object a,
           [1] int32 b,
           [2] bool CS$4$0000)
  IL_0000:  nop
  IL_0001:  ldnull
  IL_0002:  stloc.0
  IL_0003:  ldc.i4.3
  IL_0004:  stloc.1
  IL_0005:  ldloc.0
  IL_0006:  brfalse.s  IL_001d
  IL_0008:  ldloc.0
  IL_0009:  callvirt   instance string [mscorlib]System.Object::ToString()
  IL_000e:  ldstr      "sdffd"
  IL_0013:  call       bool [mscorlib]System.String::op_Equality(string,
                                                                 string)
  IL_0018:  ldc.i4.0
  IL_0019:  ceq
  IL_001b:  br.s       IL_001e
  IL_001d:  ldc.i4.0
  IL_001e:  stloc.2
  IL_001f:  ldloc.2
  IL_0020:  brtrue.s   IL_002f
  IL_0022:  nop
  IL_0023:  ldstr      "dddd"
  IL_0028:  call       void [mscorlib]System.Console::WriteLine(string)
  IL_002d:  nop
  IL_002e:  nop
  IL_002f:  ldloc.1
  IL_0030:  ldloc.1
  IL_0031:  or
  IL_0032:  call       void [mscorlib]System.Console::WriteLine(int32)
  IL_0037:  nop
  IL_0038:  call       int32 [mscorlib]System.Console::Read()
  IL_003d:  pop
  IL_003e:  ret
} // end of method Program::Main

Now you can see the difference, please don't think the '|' or 'and' as conditional operator, it just a logical operator, I don't think there is necessary to use it to judge condition

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