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I copy pasted cells of a long google spreadsheet into a txt file that is a list of email addresses separated by commas. There are many "blank" cells as well, i.e. a blank space surrounded by commas. So I could have the following list:

bob@aol.com, ,john@aol.com, , , , email@email.com

In vim, when I try to add separate each address by a new line with this command:

:%s/, /,\n/g

instead of adding a new line after the comman, I get "^@" instead.

I know this has something to do with character sets, but I don't know how to fix it.

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marked as duplicate by Josh Mein, Nathan Hughes, jzd, gcochard, Wouter J Nov 20 '13 at 18:38

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1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted

In :s's replacement field, you need to use \r not \n for newline characters.

^@ is the ASCII null character. Vim internally uses \r for newlines (which is ^M), and \n for ASCII null, so in the replacement, if you use \n you're getting those null characters instead of newlines. See also :h sub-replace-special

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Can you explain why his \n shows up as ^@ ? –  Anirudh Ramanathan Jul 29 '12 at 7:46
4  
^@ is the ASCII null character. Vim internally uses \r for newlines (which is ^M), and \n for ASCII null, so in the replacement, if you use \n you're getting those null characters instead of newlines. See also :h sub-replace-special. –  Julian Jul 29 '12 at 7:51
    
@Julian: I believe you should put that explanation in the answer. –  Michał Górny Jul 29 '12 at 8:21
    
OK, done, thanks :). –  Julian Jul 29 '12 at 13:21
2  
Vim internally does not use anything for newlines, it just have a list of lines and newline (well, \n, \r\n or \r depending on 'fileformat' option) appears at the end of the list item (or, with 'binary' and 'noendofline' options set, between two items of the list). \r character stands for itself, but two characters \r in replacement string stand for newline. \n standing for NULL is true, there is even :h NL-used-for-Nul. –  ZyX Jul 29 '12 at 13:40

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