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I wrote a small Perl script with regular expressions to get HTML components of a website.

I know its not a good way of doing this kind of job, but I was trying to test out my regex skills.

When run with either one of the two regex patterns in the while loop it runs perfectly and displays the correct output. But when I try to check both patterns in the while loop the second pattern matches every time and the loop runs infinitely.

My script:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
use strict;

while (<STDIN>) {

    while ( (m/<span class=\"itempp\">([^<]+)+?<\/span>/g) ||
            (m/<font size=\"-1\">([^<]+)+?<\/font>/g) ) {
        print "$1\n";
    }
}

I am testing the above script with a sample input:

<a href="http://linkTest">Link title</a>
<span class="itempp">$150</span>
<font size="-1"> (Location)</font>

Desired output:

$150
(Location)

Thank you! Any help would be highly appreciated!

share|improve this question
    
You would have to approach this diffently if you are processing multiple lines. As you process STDIN line wise your inner while still renders useless. Using a HTML parser would be the least error prone solution. You could also try to match blocks with the flipflop operator .. –  matthias krull Jul 29 '12 at 8:46
    
@mugenkenichi: Nonsense. The outer while iterates over the lines of the file, and the inner one iteratates over occurrences of the pattern within the line. Why is the inner while useless? –  Borodin Jul 29 '12 at 8:51
    
If you are processing multiple lines.. I meant if the starting tag is on a different line than the closing tag. Anyway, all those cases would be handled better with a specialized parser. –  matthias krull Jul 29 '12 at 8:54
    
@mugenkenichi: From the question, I know its not a good way of doing this kind of job, but I was trying to test out my regex skills. –  Borodin Jul 29 '12 at 8:59
    
yesyes.. as if there are no regular language problems to sharpen regular expression skills.. everyone has to try regexes on non-regular grammar.. modern regex engines are capable to handle those but I almost always see questions like that with regexes that are just not able to handle non-regular languages.. "But I just want to parse a subset of HTML..", "I want to test my regex skills", "Using a parser is too complicated" .. and still everyone will crawl back to a real parser after a bunch of errors and failures and corner cases. –  matthias krull Jul 29 '12 at 18:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Whenever a global regex fails to match it resets the position where the next global regex will start searching. So when the first of your two patterns fails it forces the second to look from the beginning of the string again.

This behaviour can be disabled by adding the /c modifier, which leaves the position unchanged if a regex fails to match.

In addition, you can improve your patterns by removing the escape characters (" doesn't need escaping and / needn't be escaped if you choose a different delimiter) and the superfluous +? after the captures.

Also use warnings is much better than -w on the command line.

Here is a working version of your code.

use strict;
use warnings;

while (<STDIN>) {

    while( m|<span class="itempp">([^<]+)</span>|gc
            or m|<font size="-1">([^<]+)</font>|gc ) {
        print "$1\n";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for actually explaining why the OP's code was failing. –  Alan Moore Jul 29 '12 at 10:51
    
great! I am not at all good with perl. I am trying to learn because it is just so easy to work with everything. Thank you for explaining the answer clearly and concisely –  javaCity Jul 29 '12 at 18:41
    
On that note, I have always tried to learn regex but even though I know basic stuffs like what does ? do and all, I don't know how to properly implement these. Any tips on it? Thanks! –  javaCity Jul 29 '12 at 18:44
1  
Regular-Expressions.info is a useful source. You will gain familiarity as you read and try things. I suggest playing with a regex test tool. This one supports Perl regexes. You may also like PCRE Workbench if you are running Windows. –  Borodin Jul 29 '12 at 19:44
    
thank you for the resources! have an upvote :) –  javaCity Jul 29 '12 at 20:39
while (<DATA>) {
    if (m{<(?:span class="itempp"|font size="-1")>\s*([^<]+)}i) {
        print "$1\n";
    }
}

__DATA__
<a href="http://linkTest">Link title</a>
<span class="itempp">$150</span>
<font size="-1"> (Location)</font>
share|improve this answer
    
i am sorry i had to change the 'correct answer' because @Borodin provided a well explained answer to the problem. Thank you for your effort though. –  javaCity Jul 29 '12 at 18:42

You did not change $_ after or during matching, so it will always match and run into an infinite loop.

to fix it , you can add $_=$'; after print, to run match again in the rest of string.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you! why so many downvotes though? –  javaCity Jul 29 '12 at 8:17
2  
Because assigning to $_ is a bad idea. Especially if it is just not necessary. This kind of dirty tricks should be avoided unless you know for sure what you are doing and why you need it. –  matthias krull Jul 29 '12 at 8:19
    
thank you for clarifying it out. –  javaCity Jul 29 '12 at 8:29
2  
I downvoted because it is wrong. A global regex match in scalar context will search from after the previous successful match without any help and it is failing here for a different reason. You also shouldn't be using the $' variable in general. As the documentation says, The use of this variable anywhere in a program imposes a considerable performance penalty on all regular expression matches. An additional capture, or substr $_, $+[0] is better. –  Borodin Jul 29 '12 at 8:46
    
thanks for pointing out that –  Jokester Jul 29 '12 at 9:19

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