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In my code I do the following initialization :

struct PipeShm myPipe = { .init = 0 , .flag = FALSE , .mutex = NULL , .ptr1 = NULL , .ptr2 = NULL ,
        .status1 = -10 , .status2 = -10 , .semaphoreFlag = FALSE };

int initPipe()
{
    if (!myPipe.init)
    {
        myPipe.mutex = mmap (NULL, sizeof *myPipe.mutex, PROT_READ | PROT_WRITE,MAP_SHARED | MAP_ANONYMOUS, -1, 0);

        if (!sem_init (myPipe.mutex, 1, 0))  // semaphore is initialized to 0
        {
            myPipe.init = TRUE;
        }
        else
            perror ("initPipe");
    }
    return 1;   // always successful
}

I can have multiple processes that can be invoked from main() (note the fork) .

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
You are calling fork() twice: once at the start and once inside the if conditional –  knittl Jul 29 '12 at 9:19
    
@knittl: Okay , and what's wrong with that ? this is done intentionally –  ron Jul 29 '12 at 9:20
1  
You have 4 processes in the end (parent and child both fork() again). The processes from the second fork (if(fork())) will each have a distinct copy of the original semaphore. –  knittl Jul 29 '12 at 9:22
    
@knittl: The fork in the if is taking care of the output , 1 output each time . If I add a fork before that , then I should be expecting 2 output ...or not ? .... And yes I know that they would have 2 copies , but even though , there are times that I get 1 output only .! why ? –  ron Jul 29 '12 at 9:25
1  
Likely to be a race condition. Order of execution after fork is not specified. Context switch might occur anywhere after calling fork, you never know if child or parent will be executed first. –  knittl Jul 29 '12 at 9:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

AFAICS your error is in your control variables. Only your mutex variable is shared between the processes, not your init or flag variables. These are copy on write, so you wouldn't see the changes in a different process.

You'd have to pack all of your control variables inside the segment that you create. Create an appropriate struct type for all the fields that you need.

BTW, calling a semaphore mutex is really a bad idea. A mutex has a semantic that is quite different from a semaphore. (Or if you really use it as a mutex, I didn't check, use pthread_mutex_t with pshared in the initializer.)

Edit after your edit: No it wouldn't work like this. You really have to place the whole struct in the shared segment. So your struct PipeShm must contain a sem_t sem and not a sem_t* mutex. Then you'd do something like

struct PipeShm * myPipe = 0;

int initPipe()
{
    if (!myPipe->init)
    {
        myPipe = mmap (NULL, sizeof *myPipe, PROT_READ | PROT_WRITE,MAP_SHARED | MAP_ANONYMOUS, -1, 0);

        if (!sem_init (myPipe->sem, 1, 0))  // semaphore is initialized to 0
        {
            myPipe->init = true;
        }
        else
            perror ("initPipe");
    }
    return 1;   // always successful
}

Other things you should be aware of:

  • The sem_t interfaces can be interrupted by any kind of IO or other signals. You always have to check the return of these functions and in particular restart the function if it received EINTR.
  • Mondern C has a Boolean. This you can easily use by including <stdbool.h> through names of bool, false and true.
share|improve this answer
    
I did that already , and it still continues.Please see the edited post with modifications of the struct . I have the struct in the H file , and I initialize it in the C file –  ron Jul 29 '12 at 11:01
    
Please note that I also added the new struct ... thanks! –  ron Jul 29 '12 at 13:20
    
But I use sem_wait() in my code , and its prototype is int sem_wait(sem_t *sem); , e.g. it gets a pointer as a parameter ... –  ron Jul 30 '12 at 20:48
    
I put a & and it compiles. However the problem still stands , even after I made the exact modifications you wrote. Something is very weird with this , man :) –  ron Jul 30 '12 at 21:26

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