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I'm using a test framework (tut) and noticed a lot of repeatability so I started to abstract out the predicate functions i needed. Below is a simplified example.

It works but I was hoping I could all do it in one line. The problem is when i try to instantiate the derived predicate class inline it fails to compile. Any ideas why?

#include <string>
#include <functional>
#include <iostream>


using namespace std;


template <class T>
struct TestPredicate : public binary_function<T,T,bool>
{
  virtual bool operator() (const T& expected, const T& data) const = 0;
};

template <class T>
struct IsEqual : public TestPredicate<T>
{
  virtual bool operator() (const T& expected, const T& data) const
  {
    cout << "IsEqual: " << expected << ", " << data << endl;
    return data == expected;
  }
};

template <class T>
struct IsNotEqual : public TestPredicate<T>
{
  virtual bool operator() (const T& expected, const T& data) const 
  {
    cout << "IsNotEqual: " << expected << ", " << data << endl;
    return data != expected;
  }
};

struct Tester
{
  template <class T>
  void test( const T& data, const T& expected, TestPredicate<T>& value_condition ) 
  {
    if ( value_condition( expected, data ) ) 
    {
      cout << "PASSED" << endl;
    }
    else 
    {
      cout << "FAILED" << endl;
    }
  }
};


int main() 
{
  Tester test;

  string data("hello");
  string expected("hello");

  // this doesn't compile with an inline instantiation of IsEqual
  //test.test( data, expected, IsEqual<string>() );   // compilation error (see below)

  // this works with an explicit instantiation of IsEqual
  IsEqual<string> pred;
  test.test( data, expected, pred );

  return 0;
}

Compilation Output:

test2.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
test2.cpp:61:48: error: no matching function for call to ‘Tester::test(std::string&, std::string&, IsEqual<std::basic_string<char> >)’
test2.cpp:61:48: note: candidate is:
test2.cpp:40:8: note: void Tester::test(const T&, const T&, TestPredicate<T>&) [with T = std::basic_string<char>]
test2.cpp:40:8: note:   no known conversion for argument 3 from ‘IsEqual<std::basic_string<char> >’ to ‘TestPredicate<std::basic_string<char> >&’

Using g++ 4.6.3

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your Tester::test method needs to take a const reference to the predicate to work with both instantiations.

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thought I tried that, but obviously not! thanks. –  Richard Jul 29 '12 at 21:51

In addition to the other answers, you don't really need runtime polymorphism with virtual functions. You could just make the tester take another template parameter:

template<class T, class Pred>
void test( const T& data, const T& expected, Pred value_condition ) 
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very good point. This makes the code so much simpler. I was going for readability/clear intentions - but since this is in test code it's not really relevant. However if one didn't pass Pred that wasn't of the right function signature (ie binary_function<T,T,bool>) i imagine the compilation errors would be messy. Doesn't help that you can't specify template constraints ... –  Richard Jul 29 '12 at 22:01

Temporary object are always const, that is way in test.test( data, expected, IsEqual<string>() ); IsEqual<string>() is of type const TestPredicate<T>.

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The explanation to why the compiler complains is both simple and... a bit disheartening.

The C++ Standard rules out that a temporary object (such as created by the expression IsEqual<string>()) can be bound to a const reference, in which case its lifetime is extended to that of the reference.

Because Stroustrup feared that binding to non-const references would only be a source of bugs, it is not however allowed. With hindsight, it turns out that the absence of symmetry is often more surprising; VC++ allows binding to non-const references (as an extension). In C++11, the balance is somewhat restored by allowing binding to "reference reference" (&&), though it still leaves a gap...

... and leaves us in the unpleasant situation you find yourself in.

On the web this is may be referred to as the Most important const.

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