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I don't believe Wikipedia's infoboxes take into account the various parts of a person's name such as separating the surname from the given (aka first or Christian) name, etc.

But I also believe DBPedia uses several other ontologies besides what it gets directly from Wikipedia.

So what I'm wondering is whether it's possible to make SPARQL queries which will select people from Wikipedia based on just their given name.

For instance could I query for All knights of the British empire whose first name is "Tim"?

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1  
What have you tried? Do you know an ontology containing information on the knights? As for names (given, first), there are such properties in the RDF vCard ontology. –  Tom Jul 29 '12 at 10:18
    
Actually I haven't tried anything right now because even though I love DBPedia I really suck at putting it to use without a lot of effort. In this case the lack of given name field in the infobox is a blocker and then my very vague knowledge of the various ontologies and how they link up in DBPedia to the Wikipedia data. As for knights, I thought the Wikipedia category Knights Commander of the Order of the British Empire should do the trick. –  hippietrail Jul 29 '12 at 10:23
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's a query similar to what you want:

SELECT * 
    WHERE 
      {
         ?person rdf:type yago:BritishKnights  . 
         ?person foaf:givenName ?name.
         FILTER regex(?name, "Walter", "i")
      }  
LIMIT 100

It selects British Knights with the name "Walter". It works in the DBPedia sparql endpoint. I think it's a decent starting point.

You'll find the following resources useful:

  • British Knights - the concept used in my example query
  • Knights by occupation - here you can find links to some more resources than just BritishKnights. For example, Musicians and Actors are not returned by the query above, instead, they can be found in separate categories.

  • Knights - even more general, here you'll find hyperlinks to resources describing knights from different countries, etc.

  • Sir - the concept of "Sir"
  • Friend Of A Friend - an ontology for describing people and their relations. I used its givenName property in my example
  • vCard RDF ontology - another one with name properties
  • A tutorial on SPARQL filters

EDIT: Tim Berners-Lee can also be found. The British honours system does not seem simple at all. Good luck with your search. This query takes into consideration the kind of knighthood T. Berners-Lee was honored with.

SELECT * 
WHERE 
  {
     ?person dcterms:subject category:Knights_Commander_of_the_Order_of_the_British_Empire . 
     ?person foaf:givenName ?name.
     FILTER regex(?name, "Tim", "i")
  }  
LIMIT 100

It's all a matter of getting to know the right data sets.

EDIT:

It's also possible to avoid using a FILTER if you use an appropriate RDF literal, such as:

SELECT ?person
WHERE 
  {
     ?person rdf:type yago:BritishKnights  . 
     ?person foaf:givenName "Walter"@en .
  }  

More information on this can be found in the w3c specification

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Hmm it does seem to work for "Walter" but so far I'm failing to get it to work for "Tim", with either your category or the one I found. I was inspired to ask this question when a friend mentioned "Sir Tim" and I wondered if it was computationally easy to derive a list of candidates. It turns out he was referring to Sir Tim Berners-Lee but apparently there are also at least: Sir Timothy Fetherstonhaugh, Sir Timothy Gowers, Sir Tim Hunt, Sir Tim Rice, and Sir Tim Sainsbury. But I guess the real problem could be with different kinds of knights and the messy Wikipedia category system ... –  hippietrail Jul 29 '12 at 14:55
1  
@hippietrail I found Sir Tim Berners-Lee, check my edited answer. Preparing a reliable query doesn't seem that easy. –  Tom Jul 29 '12 at 15:44
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