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def CardsAssignment():
      Cards+=1
      print (Cards)
      return break      

while True:
      CardsAssignment()

Yes, I know that I cannot return break. But how can I break a while loop by the def function? Or my concept is wrong?

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1  
When do you want to break? –  jamylak Jul 29 '12 at 12:49
3  
Why not put the loop into the method? I fear your example is too contrived. –  phant0m Jul 29 '12 at 12:52

6 Answers 6

No it cannot. Do something like:

def CardsAssignment():
  Cards+=1
  print (Cards)
  if want_to_break_while_loop:
    return False      
  else:
    return True

while True:
  if not CardsAssignment():
    break
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6  
Or possibly just while CardsAssignment(): depending on what is actually going on. –  verdesmarald Jul 29 '12 at 12:51
    
@veredesmarald: right, if this is compatible with other things that might happen in the loop, that's also possible. –  steffen Jul 29 '12 at 13:02

You could have CardsAssignment return True (to continue) or False (to stop) and then have

if not CardsAssignment():
    break

or indeed just loop

while CardsAssignment():
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If you use a for loop instead of a while, you can cause it to break early by raiseing StopIteration - this is the usual signal for a for loop to finish, and as an exception, it can be nested inside functions as deep as you need and will propagate outward until it is caught. This means you need something to iterate over - and so, you probably want to change your function into a generator:

def cards_assignment():
     cards += 1
     yield cards

for card in cards_assignment():
    print(card)

, in which case instead of doing raise StopIteration, you can just return from the generator and the loop will finish. However, note that this (as well as options having the function return a flag that you test in the loop condition) is subtly different to using break - if you use an else clause on your loop, returning from a generator will trigger it, whereas break in the loop body won't.

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A Pythonic way to do it might be something like the following:

class StopAssignments(Exception): pass

def CardsAssignment():
    Cards+=1
    print (Cards)
    if time_to_quit:
        raise StopAssignments

while True:
    try:
        CardsAssignment()
    except StopAssignments:
        break

Another idiomatic approach would be to make CardsAssignment an iterable generator function by using a yield statement. This might simplify the coding of whatever else the function does.

def CardsAssignment():
    Cards+=1
    print (Cards)
    yield time_to_quit

while CardsAssignment()
    pass
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def CardsAssignment():
      Cards+=1
      print (Cards)
      if (break_it):
          return False      
      else:
          return True      

while CardsAssignment():
    pass
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Thank you, steffen, Andrew Jaffe, Jon Clements and Tisho –  Anthony Lee Jul 29 '12 at 13:34

I would be tempted to just re-factor similar to:

def somefunc():
    from random import randint
    while True:
        r = randint(1, 100)
        if r != 42:
            yield r

And then you can do things such as:

for cnt, something in enumerate(somefunc(), start=1):
    print 'Loop {} is {}'.format(cnt, something)

This allows a possible meaningful value to be returned from somefunc() instead of using it as a "do I break" flag.

This will also allow the following construct:

sf = somefunc()
for something in sf:
    if some_condition(something):
        break

# other bits of program

for something in sf: # resume...
    pass
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