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I have some basic code to determine errors in my MVC application. Currently in my project I have a controller called Error with action methods HTTPError404(), HTTPError500(), and General(). They all accept a string parameter error. Using or modifying the code below. What is the best/proper way to pass the data to the Error controller for processing? I would like to have a robust solution as possible.

protected void Application_Error(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Exception exception = Server.GetLastError();
    Response.Clear();

    HttpException httpException = exception as HttpException;
    if (httpException != null)
    {
        RouteData routeData = new RouteData();
        routeData.Values.Add("controller", "Error");
        switch (httpException.GetHttpCode())
        {
            case 404:
                // page not found
                routeData.Values.Add("action", "HttpError404");
                break;
            case 500:
                // server error
                routeData.Values.Add("action", "HttpError500");
                break;
            default:
                routeData.Values.Add("action", "General");
                break;
        }
        routeData.Values.Add("error", exception);
        // clear error on server
        Server.ClearError();

        // at this point how to properly pass route data to error controller?
    }
}
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7 Answers 7

up vote 56 down vote accepted

Instead of creating a new route for that, you could just redirect to your controller/action and pass the information via querystring. For instance:

protected void Application_Error(object sender, EventArgs e) {
  Exception exception = Server.GetLastError();
  Response.Clear();

  HttpException httpException = exception as HttpException;

  if (httpException != null) {
    string action;

    switch (httpException.GetHttpCode()) {
      case 404:
        // page not found
        action = "HttpError404";
        break;
      case 500:
        // server error
        action = "HttpError500";
        break;
      default:
        action = "General";
        break;
      }

      // clear error on server
      Server.ClearError();

      Response.Redirect(String.Format("~/Error/{0}/?message={1}", action, exception.Message));
    }

Then your controller will receive whatever you want:

// GET: /Error/HttpError404
public ActionResult HttpError404(string message) {
   return View("SomeView", message);
}

There are some tradeoffs with your approach. Be very very careful with looping in this kind of error handling. Other thing is that since you are going through the asp.net pipeline to handle a 404, you will create a session object for all those hits. This can be an issue (performance) for heavily used systems.

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When you say "be careful of looping" what exactly do you mean? Is there a better way to handle this type of error redirect (assuming it WAS a heavily used system) ? –  aherrick Jul 23 '09 at 19:07
1  
By looping I mean when you have an error in your error page, then you would be redirected to your error page again and again... (for instance, you want to log your error in a database and it is down). –  andrecarlucci Aug 19 '09 at 13:24
81  
Redirecting on errors goes against the architecture of the web. The URI should remain the same when the server responds the correct HTTP status code so the client knows the exact context of the failure. Implementing HandleErrorAttribute.OnException or Controller.OnException is a better solution. And if those fail, do a Server.Transfer("~/Error") in Global.asax. –  asbjornu Jan 25 '10 at 12:42
    
@asbjornu - If an entity is not found, it may be perfectly acceptable to redirect rather than return a 404 error, as long as you set the HTTP response code correclty, e.g. to 301 (permanent redirect) using Response.RedirectPermanent(...) –  Chris Jul 7 '13 at 9:58
1  
@Chris, It's acceptable, but not best practice. Especially since it's often redirected to a resource file that is served with an HTTP 200 status code, which leaves the client to believe that everything went okay. –  asbjornu Jul 8 '13 at 11:53

To answer the initial question "how to properly pass routedata to error controller?":

IController errorController = new ErrorController();
errorController.Execute(new RequestContext(new HttpContextWrapper(Context), routeData));

Then in your ErrorController class, implement a function like this:

[AcceptVerbs(HttpVerbs.Get)]
public ViewResult Error(Exception exception)
{
    return View("Error", exception);
}

This pushes the exception into the View. The view page should be declared as follows:

<%@ Page Language="C#" Inherits="System.Web.Mvc.ViewPage<System.Exception>" %>

And the code to display the error:

<% if(Model != null) { %>  <p><b>Detailed error:</b><br />  <span class="error"><%= Helpers.General.GetErrorMessage((Exception)Model, false) %></span></p> <% } %>

Here is the function that gathers the all exception messages from the exception tree:

    public static string GetErrorMessage(Exception ex, bool includeStackTrace)
    {
        StringBuilder msg = new StringBuilder();
        BuildErrorMessage(ex, ref msg);
        if (includeStackTrace)
        {
            msg.Append("\n");
            msg.Append(ex.StackTrace);
        }
        return msg.ToString();
    }

    private static void BuildErrorMessage(Exception ex, ref StringBuilder msg)
    {
        if (ex != null)
        {
            msg.Append(ex.Message);
            msg.Append("\n");
            if (ex.InnerException != null)
            {
                BuildErrorMessage(ex.InnerException, ref msg);
            }
        }
    }
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I struggled with the idea of centralizing a global error handling routine in an MVC app before. I have a post on the ASP.NET forums.

It basically handles all your application errors in the global.asax without the need for an error controller, decorating with the [HandlerError] attribute, or fiddling with the customErrors node in the web.config.

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I found a solution for ajax issue noted by Lion_cl.

global.asax:

protected void Application_Error()
    {           
        if (HttpContext.Current.Request.IsAjaxRequest())
        {
            HttpContext ctx = HttpContext.Current;
            ctx.Response.Clear();
            RequestContext rc = ((MvcHandler)ctx.CurrentHandler).RequestContext;
            rc.RouteData.Values["action"] = "AjaxGlobalError";

            // TODO: distinguish between 404 and other errors if needed
            rc.RouteData.Values["newActionName"] = "WrongRequest";

            rc.RouteData.Values["controller"] = "ErrorPages";
            IControllerFactory factory = ControllerBuilder.Current.GetControllerFactory();
            IController controller = factory.CreateController(rc, "ErrorPages");
            controller.Execute(rc);
            ctx.Server.ClearError();
        }
    }

ErrorPagesController

public ActionResult AjaxGlobalError(string newActionName)
    {
        return new AjaxRedirectResult(Url.Action(newActionName), this.ControllerContext);
    }

AjaxRedirectResult

public class AjaxRedirectResult : RedirectResult
{
    public AjaxRedirectResult(string url, ControllerContext controllerContext)
        : base(url)
    {
        ExecuteResult(controllerContext);
    }

    public override void ExecuteResult(ControllerContext context)
    {
        if (context.RequestContext.HttpContext.Request.IsAjaxRequest())
        {
            JavaScriptResult result = new JavaScriptResult()
            {
                Script = "try{history.pushState(null,null,window.location.href);}catch(err){}window.location.replace('" + UrlHelper.GenerateContentUrl(this.Url, context.HttpContext) + "');"
            };

            result.ExecuteResult(context);
        }
        else
        {
            base.ExecuteResult(context);
        }
    }
}

AjaxRequestExtension

public static class AjaxRequestExtension
{
    public static bool IsAjaxRequest(this HttpRequest request)
    {
        return (request.Headers["X-Requested-With"] != null && request.Headers["X-Requested-With"] == "XMLHttpRequest");
    }
}
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While implementing this I got the following error: 'System.Web.HttpRequest' does not contain a definition for 'IsAjaxRequest'. This article has a solution: stackoverflow.com/questions/14629304/… –  Julian Dormon Mar 1 at 16:38

Perhaps a better way of handling errors in MVC is to apply the HandleError attribute to your controller or action and update the Shared/Error.aspx file to do what you want. The Model object on that page includes an Exception property as well as ControllerName and ActionName.

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Application_Error having issue with Ajax requests. If error handled in Action which called by Ajax - it will display your Error View inside the resulting container.

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Brian, This approach works great for non-Ajax requests, but as Lion_cl stated, if you have an error during an Ajax call, your Share/Error.aspx view (or your custom error page view) will be returned to the Ajax caller--the user will NOT be redirected to the error page.

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