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I am currently trying to learn how to use smart pointers. However while doing some experiments I discovered the following situation for which I could not find a satifying solution:

Imagine you have an object of class A being parent of an object of class B (the child), but both should know each other:

class A;
class B;

class A
{
public:
    // Constructor...
    A(void);

    // Add children
    void addChildren(std::shared_ptr<B> child)
    {
        children->push_back(child);


        // How to do pass the pointer right?
        child->setParent(  this  ); // wrong

    };

    // Get a children (just an example for another member function of A)
    std::weak_ptr<B> getChildren(size_t index);

private:        
    // A list of children of class B
    std::list<std::shared_ptr<B>> children;
};


class B
{
public:
    // Constructor...
    B();

    // Associate child with parent
    setParent(std::shared_ptr<A> parentA)
    {
        ptrToParentA = parentA;
    };

private:
    std::shared_ptr<A> ptrToParentA;
};

The question is how can an object of class A pass a std::shared_ptr of itself (this) to its child?

There are solutions for Boost shared pointers (Getting a boost::shared_ptr for this), but how to handle this using the std:: smart pointers?

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1  
As is with any other tool you have to use it when it's appropriate. Using smart pointers for what you are doing is not –  YePhIcK Jul 29 '12 at 16:50
    
Similarly to boost. See here. –  juanchopanza Jul 29 '12 at 16:53
1  
This is a problem at that level of abstraction. You don't even know that "this" points to memory on the heap. –  Vaughn Cato Jul 29 '12 at 16:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

There is std::enable_shared_from_this just for this purpose. You inherit from it and you can call shared_from_this() from inside the class. Also you are creating circular dependencies here that can lead to resource leaks. That can be resolved with the use of std::weak_ptr. So your code might look like this (assuming children rely on existence of parent and not the other way around):

class A;
class B;

class A
    : public std::enable_shared_from_this<A>
{
public:
    void addChild(std::shared_ptr<B> child)
    {
        children.push_back(child);
        child->setParent(shared_from_this());
    };

private:        
    std::list<std::weak_ptr<B>> children;
};

class B
{
public:

    void setParent(std::shared_ptr<A> parentA)
    {
        ptrToParentA = parentA;
    };

private:
    std::shared_ptr<A> ptrToParentA;
};

Note however, that calling shared_from_this() requres that this is owned by std::shared_ptr at the point of call. This means that you cannot create such object on stack anymore, and cannot call shared_from_this in it's constructor.

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Thank you for your explanation and for pointing out my circular dependency problem. –  Icarus Jul 29 '12 at 17:11

You have several problems in you design, that seem to stem from you misunderstanding of smart pointers.

Smart pointers are used to declare ownership. You are breaking this by declaring that both the parents owns all children, but also that each child own it's parent. Both can't be true.

Also, you are returning a weak pointer in getChild(). By doing so, you are declaring that the caller shouldn't care about the ownership. Now this can be very limiting, but also by doing so, you must make sure that the child in question won't get destroyed while any weak pointers are still held, if you would use a smart pointer, it would get sorted out by itself.

And the final thing. Usually, when you are accepting new entities, you should usually accept raw pointers. Smart pointer can have their own meaning for swapping children between parents, but for general usage, you should accept raw pointers.

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Looks like I really need to clarify my understanding of smart pointers. Thank you for pointing that out. –  Icarus Jul 29 '12 at 17:13

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