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So, I'm trying to set up a series of checkboxes that, when clicked, will add a number, depending on the checkbox to either the int variable attackTotal or damageTotal, which will in turn be shown in some textviews.

Currently, however, clicking the top checkbox acts as if I had clicked both it, and every checkbox after it in the switch statement. The second clickbox seems to activate itself and all the following ones as well, etcetera etcetera...

So here's the code I've gotten together.

public void onCheckboxClicked(View v) {
    // Is the view now checked?
    boolean checked = ((CheckBox) v).isChecked();


    // Check which checkbox was clicked
    switch(v.getId()) {

    case R.id.checkBox1:
        if (checked)
                {
                flankAttack=2;
                }

        else
                {
                flankAttack=0;
                }

    case R.id.checkBox2:
        if (checked)
                {
                pbs=1;                  
                }
        else
                {
                pbs=0;
                }

all the way down to..

        case R.id.checkBox10:
            if (checked)
            {
                attackTotal=attack+flankAttack+pbs;
                damageTotal=damage+pbs;

                TextView textView = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.textView2);
                TextView textView2 = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.textView4);
                textView.setText(Integer.toString(attackTotal));
                textView2.setText(Integer.toString(damageTotal));
            }
            else
            {
                attackTotal=attack+flankAttack+pbs;
                damageTotal=damage+pbs;

                TextView textView = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.textView2);
                TextView textView2 = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.textView4);
                textView.setText(Integer.toString(attackTotal));
                textView2.setText(Integer.toString(damageTotal));
            }

I only started trying to figure out this programming stuff on Friday, so be gentle.

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

just before case R.id.checkBox2: you need to have a break; to tell the program to break from the switch statement. Otherwise anything meeting R.id.checkBox1 just continue through and executes all the logic you have for R.id.checkBox2 as well. (You need break; before all your other cases as well).

share|improve this answer
    
From this and all the other responses, I suspect my problem is, indeed, the lack of a break;. I'll put those in and get back to you to let everyone know how the program worked. Thanks! – Rob Hodgson Jul 29 '12 at 20:33
    
This worked great! except for the last Case which is giving me some trouble. I'll post about it as a new question though, since I dont THINK it's related. – Rob Hodgson Jul 29 '12 at 23:25
1  
@RobHodgson, how about you try and debug it before you go asking a new question? – Jonathon Reinhart Jul 30 '12 at 0:20

You forgot adding break; in the end of every case.

share|improve this answer

You forgot the break statement after each case. It is falling through to the next case each time.

Also, I strongly recommend not to put more than a few lines of code in a case statement, else it gets ugly very fast and hard to work with. Instead, pull out each case into its own method. Usually it will be easy to come up with a good name for each that is self-documenting:

switch (foo) {
    case 0:
        do();
        lots();
        of();
        things();
        break;
    case 1:
        do();
        other();
        things();
        break;
    case 2:
        if (ugly)
        {
            this_gets();
            messy();
            quickly();
        }
        else
        {
            we_could();
            do_better();
        }
        break;
}

Becomes:

void do_case_0() {
    do();
    lots();
    of();
    things();
}

void do_case_1() {
    do();
    other();
    things();
}

void do_case_2() {
    if (ugly)
    {
        this_gets();
        messy();
        quickly();
    }
    else
    {
        we_could();
        do_better();
    }
}


// ...
    switch (foo) {
        case 0:    do_case_0();    break;
        case 1:    do_case_1();    break;
        case 2:    do_case_2();    break;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
how does one "pull a case out into it's own method"? My apologies if this is an incredibly newbish question, I'm about as unexperienced a programmer as one can be. – Rob Hodgson Jul 29 '12 at 20:31
    
@RobHodgson Edited to show what I meant. The code from each case statement became its own method (function). And I called the method in the switch statement instead, making it much cleaner and easier to follow. – Jonathon Reinhart Jul 30 '12 at 0:28

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