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i need a secure (AES Encrypted) File, which is the fastes for parse, the smallest footprint and easy to work with.

What can you suggest? XML, JSON, YAML or Google Protocol Buffers maybe?

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Encryption is orthogonal to the choice of serializer. –  CodesInChaos Jul 29 '12 at 18:39
    
It's much more relevant which platform you're using. On .net/mono protobuf-net is pretty good, but it requires more configuration/annotation than other formats. –  CodesInChaos Jul 29 '12 at 18:40
    
i use qt/c++ and iOs, android –  slopsucker Jul 29 '12 at 18:42
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@CodesInChaos yes, the short codes used by protobuf don't come from nowhere, but (see image here) the upshot is it is damn quick, even on light frameworks –  Marc Gravell Jul 29 '12 at 18:51
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@slopsucker the first depends entirely on what encryption APIs are available. Personally, I would hope to use a "decorator" style encrypting/decrypting stream, but I don't know what is available for C++/android. I know protobuf-net will work with Mono on android, but that isn't quite your preferred target, it seems. There are other protobuf implementations - indeed you could try the Google-owned c++ core implementation. –  Marc Gravell Jul 29 '12 at 19:28

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Well, XML/JSON etc are text based, which can make them slightly more expensive to parse (extra string work etc), and certainly larger (all those names in the payload). For both those reasons something like protobuf will certainly be useful if parse-cost and bandwidth are concerned. As for easy to work with: most platforms have a protobuf implementation. For deployment footprint: that would vary between platform and implementation - you'd have to check on your target platform, but: something built-in may be advantageous; as for what comes pre-installed as part of the mobile platform's SDK, that again depends on your target platform; I would expect XML for certain, JSON as likely.

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