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I'm building a simulator for a 40 card's deck game. The deck is divided into 4 seeds, each one with 10 cards. Since there's only 1 seed that's different from the others ( let's say, hearts ) , I've thinked of a quite convinient way to store a set of 4 cards with the same value in 3 bits: the first two indicate how many cards of a given value are left, and the last one is a marker that tells if the heart card of that value is still in the deck. So,

{7h 7c 7s} = 101

That allows me to store the whole deck on 30 bits of memory instead of 40. Now, when i was programming in C, I'd have allocated 4 chars ( 1 byte each = 32 bits), and played with the values with bit operations. In C# I can't do that, since chars are 2 bytes each and playing with bits is much more of a pain, so, the question is : what's the smallest amount of memory I'll have to use to store the data required?

PS: Keep in mind that i may have to allocate 100k+ of those decks in system's memory, so saving 10 bits is quite a lot

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Might be some typos here? "I've thinked of a quite convinient way to store the whole deck in 3 bits" ... then "That allows me to store the whole deck on 30 bits" –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jul 29 '12 at 18:51
    
Your question is quite confusing, partly because when you say "3 bits" I think you mean "3 parts" - I took that to mean "3 bits" as in "just under half a byte" to start with. –  Jon Skeet Jul 29 '12 at 18:53
    
You're both right, there are some typos. What I meant is, I can store 4 cards having the same value in just 3 bits, and since I've 10 values types ( 1-7 and 3 figures ), I need 3 bits * 10 = 30 bits to store the whole deck –  kaharas Jul 29 '12 at 19:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

in C, I'd have allocated 3 chars ( 1 byte each = 32 bits)

3 bytes gives you 24 bits, not 32... you need 4 bytes to get 32 bits. (Okay, some platforms have non-8-bit bytes, but they're pretty rare these days.)

In C# I can't do that, since chars are 2 bytes each

Yes, so you use byte instead of char. You shouldn't be using char for non-textual information.

and playing with bits is much more of a pain

In what way?

But if you need to store 30 bits, just use an int or a uint. Or, better, create your own custom value type which backs the data with an int, but exposes appropriate properties and constructors to make it better to work with.

PS: Keep in mind that i may have to allocate 100k+ of those decks in system's memory, so saving 10 bits is quite a lot

Is it a significant amount though? If it turned out you needed to store 8 bytes per deck instead of 4 bytes, that means 800M instead of 400M for 100,000 of them. Still less than a gig of memory. That's not that much...

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32/8 = 4, indeed :) Sorry for the typo. And about the last comment... I may be old school on that, but if i can chose between 400MB of memory requirement and 800MB, I'll pick the first any time ( if that doesn't cost too much performance wise, that is ) –  kaharas Jul 29 '12 at 19:16

In C#, unlike in C/C++, the concept of a byte is not overloaded with the concept of a character.

Check out the byte datatype, in particular a byte[], which many of the APIs in the .Net Framework have special support for.

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C# (and modern versions of C) have a type that's exactly 8 bits: byte (or uint8_t in C), so you should use that. C char usually is 8 bits, but it's not guaranteed and so you shouldn't rely on that.

In C#, you should use char and string only when dealing with actual characters and strings of characters, don't treat them as numbers.

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