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I am working on an exercise in C++ and I am trying to understand how to remove an element from a list and shift the rest to the left. I wonder if there is a neat solution. Here is my version, it seems to do the job, but I have a feeling there is a better way:

Account AccountList::remove(int i){
if(i>=0 && i<size()) {
    for (int n = i; n < size(); n++) {
        if(i+1!=size()) {
            aList[n]=aList[n+1];
        }
    }
    sz--;
    return aList[i];
} else {
    return Account();
}
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You have two issues in this.

  1. You are not returning the removed element, instead overwriting it with the next element and returning that one. I don't think this is your intention.
  2. Your loop range is not right. With this loop, you will go past the array bounds with the index n+1 when n = size() - 1

The corrected one is given below.

Account AccountList::remove(int i)
{
  if(i>=0 && i<size()) 
  {
    Account a = aList[i]
    for (int n = i; n < size() - 1; n++) 
    {
        if(i+1!=size()) 
        {
            aList[n]=aList[n+1];
        }
    }
    sz--;
    return a;
  } else 
  {
    return Account();
  }
}
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If you're doing this, you're not implementing the list correctly. A list should have complexity O(1) for removing an element. That looks more like an array or a vector.

A list typically consists of nodes linked to each other, in which case you'd only need to delete the node in question and make the previous node point to the node after the one you're deleting.

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2  
A list does not need to be a linked list. It's acceptable to use an array as the back end structure. –  Isaiah van der Elst Jul 29 '12 at 18:59
1  
Even if one assumes that List can only ever mean a linked list (why, what about a skiplist or an arraylist?) a linked list doesn't have O(1) remove for arbitrary elements due to the O(n) lookup. –  Grizzly Jul 29 '12 at 19:02
    
@Grizzly yes, but I was assuming you already have a pointer to the node being removed. In this case it would be begin() + n. –  Luchian Grigore Jul 29 '12 at 19:03
2  
@Luchian Grigore, that is not correct. A list's (typically a linked list) removal complexity is O(n), not O(1). On the other hand, the array's complexity is O(1) –  arahant Jul 29 '12 at 19:04
    
@IsaiahvanderElst I was referring to the usual C++ implementation of a list. Otherwise, how is it any different than an array? –  Luchian Grigore Jul 29 '12 at 19:04

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