Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

New to XML/XSL/Xpath, and I've scoured these boards for an answer to a seemingly simple problem, but maybe I'm too new to XSL to understand some of the answers out there that might address this.

I want to select a set of nodes that match a different set of node values stored elsewhere in the doc, so that:

<body>
    <partlist>
        <part>head</part>
        <part>spleen</part>
        <part>toe</part>
    </partlist>
    <parts>
        <head>this is a head</head>
        <spleen>this is a spleen</spleen>
        <toe>big toe</toe>
        <toe>big toe</toe>
    <parts>
</body>

So that, let's say I want to count all the "parts", but I don't know the "parts" node names, I would want an XPath expr to match a set of nodes whose names are equal to the values of another set of nodes...

I am new enough to XSL to both imagine that a solution is very simple, but experienced enough to realize that expecting a simple solution from XSL is a sure wrong path.

In my procedural-based ignorance, this is what I have tried:

<xsl:template match="/">
    <xsl:apply-templates select="partlist/part">
        <xsl:with-param name="parts" select="parts"/>
    </xsl:apply-templates>
</xsl:template>
<xsl:template match="part">
    <xsl:param name="parts"/>
    <xsl:value-of select="count($parts[.])"/>        
</xsl:template>

But this is completely wrong. Any help is much appreciated.

Edit: Thanks for the answers, but I think I'm not being understood - the fault is mine, because I haven't been perfectly clear... What I need is a single result telling me if there are ANY nodes that match the node value of the referring set... that I think changes the query, because I'm not trying to output a list of counts, I'm trying to match a set against a set to count the total... but let me clarify with XSL, if such a thing is possible.. here's my code from above, slightly modified to make my intention clear:

<xsl:template match="/">
    <xsl:apply-templates select="partlist/part">
        <xsl:with-param name="parts" select="parts"/>
    </xsl:apply-templates>
</xsl:template>
<xsl:template match="part">
    <xsl:param name="parts"/>
    <xsl:if select="count($parts[.]) &gt; 0">1</xsl:if>        
</xsl:template>

the above when applied to the xml doc example should output:

1

Does this make sense?

Edit: I should also specify that I am limited to XSL 1.0

share|improve this question
    
i have a sinking feeling that this question is going to be one of those "if you understood xsl and xpath you wouldn't ask this kind of question", which basically means it can't be done. I gotta say, with a background in procedural and oop, i'm confused why anyone would devise a language where the answer is so frequently, "it can't be done". –  user1558945 Jul 30 '12 at 6:46
1  
I've never heard "it can't be done" said about XSLT. It's certainly less obvious in some cases, but it can always be done. XSLT has a functional background, which is why it seems so weird to people with OOP/imperative backgrounds. There are also plenty of cases where an XSLT solution is super easy compared to a procedural one, e.g. almost anything involving the identity template –  Francis Avila Jul 30 '12 at 14:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use the local-name() function to get the name of a node so you can compare it against a given value.

For example, your stylesheet could be modified to this:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">

  <xsl:template match="/">
    <xsl:apply-templates select="body/partlist/part"/>
  </xsl:template>

  <xsl:template match="part">
    <xsl:variable name="part" select="."/>
    <xsl:value-of select="count(/body/parts/*[local-name() = $part])"/>
  </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

Edited to add:

You can also compare against sets of values instead of just single values. From XPath 1.0 spec, section 3.4:

If one object to be compared is a node-set and the other is a string, then the comparison will be true if and only if there is a node in the node-set such that the result of performing the comparison on the string-value of the node and the other string is true.

If you want to count how many elements you have under /body/parts whose local name matches the parts listed in /body/partlist/part, you could do it with this XPath expression:

count(/body/parts/*[local-name() = /body/partlist/part])

The last transformation from the question, added after the edit, could be rewritten for example like this:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">

  <xsl:template match="body">
    <xsl:apply-templates select="partlist">
      <xsl:with-param name="parts" select="parts"/>
    </xsl:apply-templates>
  </xsl:template>

  <xsl:template match="partlist">
    <xsl:param name="parts"/>
    <xsl:if test="count($parts/*[local-name() = current()/part]) &gt; 0">1</xsl:if>        
  </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, this is clear, unfortunately I see that my answer was not. I've modified it so hopefully it makes more sense: it isn't a single value I'm wanting to compare against, it's a set of values... –  user1558945 Jul 29 '12 at 23:08
    
@user1558945, edited the answer on how to compare against a set of values instead of just one –  Jukka Matilainen Jul 30 '12 at 14:13
    
brilliant, thanks! I was about to give up. –  user1558945 Jul 30 '12 at 15:44

I. This XSLT 1.0 transformation:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output method="text"/>

 <xsl:template match="part">
  <xsl:value-of select="."/>

  <xsl:value-of select=
  "concat(': ',
          count(/*/parts/*[name() = current()]),
          '&#xA;')"/>
 </xsl:template>
 <xsl:template match="text()"/>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when applied on the provided XML document:

<body>
    <partlist>
        <part>head</part>
        <part>spleen</part>
        <part>toe</part>
    </partlist>
    <parts>
        <head>this is a head</head>
        <spleen>this is a spleen</spleen>
        <toe>big toe</toe>
        <toe>big toe</toe>
    </parts>
</body>

produces the wanted, correct result:

head: 1
spleen: 1
toe: 2

Explanation:

Proper use of templates and the current() function.


II. With a single XPath 2.0 expression:

   /*/partlist
       /part
          /concat(.,
                  ': ', for $p in .
                         return count(/*/parts/*[name() eq $p]),
                  '&#xA;'
                 )

When this Xpath 2.0 expression is evaluated against the same XML document (above), the wanted, correct result is produced:

 head: 1
 spleen: 1
 toe: 2

Here is an XSLT 2.0 - based verification:

<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
 xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
 <xsl:output method="text"/>

 <xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:sequence select=
  "/*/partlist
       /part
          /concat(.,
                  ': ', for $p in .
                         return count(/*/parts/*[name() eq $p]),
                  '&#xA;'
                 )
  "/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

Update:

The OP has now changed the question and it seems that he wants to:

What I need is a single result telling me if there are ANY nodes that match the node value of the referring set...

This is equally simple to do -- can be obtained with a single XPath expression:

/*/parts/*[name() = /*/partlist/part]

This expression evaluates to true() exactly when there is some /*/parts/* whose name() is one of the string values of the /*/partlist/part elements.

The above expression can be used "as-is" at any place where a boolean is expected (such as in any predicate, as the value of a test attribute of an xsl:if or xsl:when instruction, ..., etc.

If the value 1 is wanted (anf not true()), just use:

number(/*/parts/*[name() = /*/partlist/part])

This gives us the wanted result 1 or 0, because by definition:

number(true()) = 1

and

number(false()) = 0
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.