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I am trying to create an inline function for a comparer to qsort - something like this:

function<int(int,int)> comparesort = [smarkers, emarkers, strSearch] (int *arg1, int *arg2) { return 0; };
qsort(sortptrs, nKeywords, sizeof(int), comparesort);

It's giving me this error

IntelliSense: no suitable conversion function from "std::tr1::function" to "int (__cdecl *)(const void *, const void *)" exists

ok - I changed it to this

auto comparesort = [sortptrs, smarkers, emarkers, strSearch] (int arg1, int arg2)
{
    int a = 0;
    .
    .
    .
    return a;
};

std::sort(sortptrs, sortptrs + nKeywords, comparesort);

and it's giving an error:

error C3499: a lambda that has been specified to have a void return type cannot return a value

[edit on 7/30 3:55 pm]

I actually needed a pointer sort - I've got an array of start and end bytes of words (found in a string passed in from VB.Net managed code). I also have a pointer-array that contains "1,2,3..." and I needed to sort the pointer.

Didn't seem I could do that with std::sort so I implemented my own shell sort...

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1  
qsort?! What about using std::sort? –  Bo Persson Jul 29 '12 at 21:35
    
@BoPersson - I tried std::sort - having a problem with the return type of the function –  szlamany Jul 29 '12 at 22:46
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3 Answers

The signature of qsort takes a function pointer of type int(*)(const void*, const void*). You are trying to give it a function<int(int, int)>, which is not a function pointer, but an object encapsulating something (might be a function ptr, might be a functor) which is callable as int(int, int) (note that it wouldn't have the right signature, even if it was a function pointer).

qsort is a basically a legacy function for backward compatibility with c. In c++ I would strongly suggest forgetting about it and using std::sort instead:

auto comparesort = [smarkers, emarkers, strSearch] (const  int& arg1, const int& arg2) { return false; }; 
//directly store the lambda, avoiding the overhead of creating a `function<...>`
std::sort(sortptrs, sortptrs + nKeywords, comparesort);
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@szlamany: And how exactly is it not working? –  Grizzly Jul 29 '12 at 22:13
    
Ok - I posted more details up in the OP –  szlamany Jul 29 '12 at 22:22
    
did you see the new code I tried? I posted it in the up top in the OP... –  szlamany Jul 29 '12 at 22:42
    
@szlamany: Your lambda isn't correct. For lambdas with more then one line you need to explicitely mention the return type (Which should be bool not int for std::sort). –  Grizzly Jul 29 '12 at 22:46
    
If it's bool then it's not the old -1/0/1 that regular comparer use. What is the TRUE for and what is the FALSE for? And how would I actually declare the lambda - I'm totally new to C++ here so the syntax is killing me! Thanks! –  szlamany Jul 29 '12 at 23:05
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qsort is the old C API that takes a function pointer directly. You can't use it with anything else such as lambdas. Instead, use std::sort.

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1  
Almost right - it will take a non-capturing lambda too. Still, std::sort is more efficient. –  MSalters Jul 29 '12 at 22:10
    
@msalters - I'm having a hard time getting the return type of the lamdba function working - I posted more code up top –  szlamany Jul 29 '12 at 22:44
    
@szlamany: Your lambda is capturing. A non-capturing lambda starts with [], an empty capture list. –  MSalters Jul 30 '12 at 7:39
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I actually needed a pointer sort - I've got an array of start and end bytes of words (found in a string passed in from VB.Net managed code).

I also have a pointer-array that contains "1,2,3..." and I needed to sort the pointer.

Didn't seem I could do that with std::sort so I implemented my own shell sort...

share|improve this answer
    
Your description what you needed is kind of confusing, so I'm not 100% sure what you mean, but I'm pretty sure you could actually do that with std::sort given an approriate functor and iterator adapter. But you know if you told us upfront what exactly you were trying to do it would have been much easier to answer your question/solve your problem... –  Grizzly Jul 30 '12 at 20:14
    
I had not coded my own shell sort in a decade - found the C++ QSORT and was having a hard time making a comparer function. Got told that I needed to use std::sort - tried that. I needed to do more than check HIGH/LOW comparison - so I thought putting objects into []'s would give me the same as closure does in JAVASCRIPT - so I could have access to my arrays and "text area" that the sort needed. New to C++ here - so I'm struggling over simple stuff like pointer and argument definitions. I guess that is what "capturing" is in C++. I've got a wrox book coming in the mail tomorrow! Thanks! –  szlamany Aug 1 '12 at 15:35
    
I just meant that if you had explained in your question how the comparison was supposed to work you would probably have gotten a working solution as an answer without all that need for clarifications. It also helps if you mention any lack of knowlegde. When you use a lambda in your question I typically assume that you know how to use them. –  Grizzly Aug 1 '12 at 22:06
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