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I'm not able to describe my thought precisely in words, so here's an example:

[
  {
    'description': 'fruits',
    'examples': [
      {
        'name': 'Apple',
        'color': ['red', 'green']
      },
      {
        'name': 'Banana',
        'color': 'yellow'
      }
    ]
  },
  {
    'description': 'vegetables',
    'examples': [
      {
        'name': 'Tomato',
        'color': 'red'
      },
      {
        'name': 'Carrot',
        'color': 'orange'
      }
    ]
  },
  {
    'description': 'Wweets',
    'examples': [
      {
        'name': 'Chocolate',
        'color': ['brown', 'black', 'white']
      },
      {
        'name': 'Candy',
        'color': 'various'
      }
    ]
  }
]

Let's go step by step:

If I want to see all food categories, I query by the following command

db.food.find()

I want to see the vegetables

db.food.find({ 'description': 'vegetables' })

Now let's say I forgot how a Carrot looks like (lol). What do I do? I tried the following (Native node.js MongoDB driver):

collection.find({'examples.name': 'Carrot'}, function(err, example){
  console.log(example)
  // It still returns me the whole object!
});

As a result I expected MongoDB to return the next highest instance of the object. For example I wanted to do this.

console.log(example.color)
// 'orange'

Do you have any idea? I'm new to document oriented DBs :/

share|improve this question
    
hey, with find, you get the entire document, en you cannot get a portion. So, you get the document, and you seek the index by a little function ;) – user1255808 Jul 29 '12 at 22:52
    
Hey, how does this little function look like? :) Am I able to implement it in my node application? I am new to this whole thing. – aydio Jul 30 '12 at 5:33
    
look the answer of aydio ;) So, you create a lib, for basic operation with this function. And you require. ;) edit: ohhh it's you lol – user1255808 Jul 30 '12 at 11:56
up vote 2 down vote accepted

When you store a bunch of objects in a single document you will (by default) get back the entire document. [*]

When one of the fields of the document is an array, you will get back the full array if the item you are trying to match is found in the array.

Don't fall for the temptation to cram everything into a single document if you will normally be getting back only a subset of those things.

You have an alternative available:

You can store a collection of foods where every food has a field "type" which is "fruit" or "vegetable" or "...". You can still query for all foods, or just foods of type "fruit" or just food with name "carrot", etc.

Arrays are great for lists of attributes of a particular object/document, they are not as good when you cram documents into them that you then want to get back as first-class objects.

[*] there is a way to project and get only a subset of the fields, but you will still get back entire fields.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the clarification. Yesterday I thought I had a very productive day because I almost finished programming the entire platform, but now I'm stuck and I probably have to rethink my document structure... :( Maybe I'll end up doing object references but that would miss the point of mongodb... I'll look for other solutions. – aydio Jul 30 '12 at 5:32
    
a) I don't see why you need object references and b) I don't see why that misses the point of mongoDB... – Asya Kamsky Jul 30 '12 at 9:57
    
Object reference because my current model is extremely deep-nested and leads to problems like this. As far as I know MongoDB follows the philosophy of storing data in the corresponsing object (saving comments directly within a post etc.) But as I said, I'm completely new to document-oriented databases so don't take my words too serious - I just want to learn... – aydio Jul 30 '12 at 10:32
    
it's perfectly fine to store comments in a separate collection from posts - in fact you want to store things separately that can keep growing. Check out some of the schema design presentations on 10gen.com site for some discussion/examples. – Asya Kamsky Jul 31 '12 at 1:09
    
for now I am storing the comments within the entity (in my case it's a company being rated). However, thanks for pointing me to the 10gen presentations, I'll take a look at that. I also bought the MongoDB book from O'Reilly and will probably finish the book before I go live with my app. – aydio Aug 1 '12 at 20:21

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