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I have the following C++ code (not a complete program):

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>

std::struct Features{
  int F1;
  int F2;
  int F3;
  int F4;
};

std::int criterionFunction(Features const& features){
  return -2*features.F1*features.F2 + 3*features.F1 + 5*features.F2
         -2*features.F1*features.F2*features.F3 + 7*features.F3 + 4*features.F4
         -2*features.F1*features.F2*features.F3*features.F4;
}

int main(){
  Features feature;
  std::vector<Features> listOfFeatures(4);

  listOfFeatures.push_back(feature.F1);
  listOfFeatures.push_back(feature.F2);
  listOfFeatures.push_back(feature.F3);
  listOfFeatures.push_back(feature.F4);

  std::vector<int> listOfCriterion;

}

I want to pass values to criterionFunction(), and, in order to get the result from return, the passed value will have the value 1 in the function, and the value that is not passed will have the value 0. So, for example, if I pass F1, it has to be substituted by 1 in the function. How can I do that?

Thanks.

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closed as not a real question by casperOne Jul 30 '12 at 12:16

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

7  
Maybe it's just because I'm tired, but I can't really understand the question. Could you give an example of what sort of thing you want? –  Mark Byers Jul 29 '12 at 22:17
2  
I think you should start from the beginning and get some introductory text. std::int is not valid C++. Also, what do you meant by passed or not passed? It is not clear, in C++ you cannot make an int optional (directly), so you will have to depend on external knowledge (for example, -1 as a mark of unused...) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 29 '12 at 22:18
    
Why std::struct? You don't have to prefix every keyword with the std:: qualifier. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 29 '12 at 22:20
1  
This code isn't valid C++. –  Brian Neal Jul 29 '12 at 22:22
1  
std::struct, lol –  Puppy Jul 29 '12 at 22:30

2 Answers 2

Maybe this is getting at what you are trying to do:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>

struct Features {
  int F1;
  int F2;
  int F3;
  int F4;
  Features(int F1,int F2,int F3,int F4)
  : F1(F1), F2(F2), F3(F3), F4(F4) { }
};

int criterionFunction(Features const& features){
  return -2*features.F1*features.F2 + 3*features.F1 + 5*features.F2
         -2*features.F1*features.F2*features.F3 + 7*features.F3 + 4*features.F4
         -2*features.F1*features.F2*features.F3*features.F4;
}

int main(){
  Features feature;
  std::vector<Features> listOfFeatures(4);

  listOfFeatures.push_back(Features(1,0,0,0));
  listOfFeatures.push_back(Features(0,1,0,0));
  listOfFeatures.push_back(Features(0,0,1,0));
  listOfFeatures.push_back(Features(0,0,0,1));

  std::vector<int> listOfCriterion;

}
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I think that's close to what they're after (though you have to read between the lines and squint quite hard), but the added wrinkle is that they'd like to be able to specify one value in the constructor and allocate it to the relevant field. That doesn't work. If the structure contained an array, then a two-argument constructor could be devised with index and value. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 29 '12 at 22:29
    
@JonathanLeffler: Yeah. You could do something interesting by passing a member pointer, but this seems like a more basic question. –  Vaughn Cato Jul 29 '12 at 22:30

You could give Features some more structure:

struct Features
{
    enum EFeature { Ft1, Ft2, Ft3, Ft3 };
    bool F1, F2, F3, F4;
    explicit Features(EFeature f) : F1(false), F2(false), F3(false), F4(false)
    {
        switch (f)
        {
            case Ft1: F1 = true; break;
            // ...
        }
    }
};

Now say:

listOfFeatures.push_back(Features(Features::F2));  // old C++
listOfFeatures.emplace_back(Features::F3);         // C++11

Since booleans are converted to 0/1, you can use them in your code as written.

Also, you should change the vector initialization to this:

std::vector<Features> listOfFeatures;
listOfFeatures.reserve(4);

The constructor you wrote already creates four elements, but you don't want that, since you push-back four new elements.

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