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In a function whose entire logic falls along the lines of "if this condition is true/false, return this, else return this", what is the best or perhaps most accepted form for this to take? There seem to be 3 ways I've seen.

int function(bool foo){
    if(foo){
         return doSomething();
    }else{
         return somethingElse;
    }
}

This makes the most sense, but I've once read that a function with a return type should never have its return type located in a branch. (Why, the source never said) So then there's this:

int function(bool foo){
    if(foo){
         return doSomething();
    }
    return somethingElse;
}

That has a return type outside of a branch, but it takes away some of the meaning of the code I think, and I've also read there's benefits to if-else blocks. (What those are, the source didn't say either) Finally, there's this:

int function(bool foo){
    int result;
    if(foo){
         result = doSomething();
    }else{
         result = somethingElse;
    }
    return result;
}

The meaning is there, return is outside of a branch, but at the addition of a variable and code that wasn't really needed for the functionality.

My question is which of these three forms, or any other form if there is one, would be the best way to write a function in this vein?

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closed as not constructive by GManNickG, jweyrich, Jesse Good, Nicol Bolas, Vlad Lazarenko Jul 30 '12 at 3:11

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
I prefer the second, but I don't think it's going to matter at all. The third seems a bit iffy to me, though, unless you're a person who's stuck on the principle of one return statement per function. –  chris Jul 30 '12 at 1:47
3  
Too subjective. I personally would write: return foo ? doSomething() : somethingElse;. –  GManNickG Jul 30 '12 at 1:49
1  
    
@JesseGood 'Where did the notion of “one return only” come from?' - same place as 'don't use new() - always create objects on the stack', 'memory should be freed by the function that allocated it', 'always use references instead of pointers', 'you must terminate all threads cleanly before exiting you app', 'always use timers instead of sleep' and all the other odd 'rules' that continually pop up like 'Whack-a-Mole' and seem to exist solely to force inefficiency, inappropriate design and unmaintainable code on developers who have enough problems already with 'real' bugs. –  Martin James Jul 30 '12 at 2:35
    
@MartinJames i.e. All from a Java programmer... –  Casey Jul 30 '12 at 3:10

1 Answer 1

Good question. Shows you are thinking about style, readability, and underlying reasons why we write the same code in different ways. In the end it's down to you.

Number 1 is fine and very clear.

Number 2 I usually use when I am testing for an error condition. If I get all the way to the bottom, then I return success. A bonus is you can often drop the curly braces without losing clarity.

Number 3 is normally useful when setting results from inside loops, where multiple kinds of return value are possible, or when the return value is passed on from some other call and you require intermediate checking. Oh, it's also appropriate where you have to do some common cleanup that is not dependent on your return value.

You wouldn't normally do number 3 in simple cases. You would want to have a good reason for storing the value in a variable.

You could argue there's a fourth option here: the query-colon operator. Useful if you think that inlining simple class members is good style =)

int function(bool foo) { return foo ? doSomething() : somethingElse; }

I wrote that in one line because that's usually when you see it.

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