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I am not sure what obj is in MonitorEnter JNI function. Is it obj passed as parameter in native function or shared variable which I want to synchronize? I have a variable called buffer which is shared by two threads. This is my code.

JNIEXPORT void JNICALL Java_company_com_HelloActivity_setBuffer(JNIEnv *env, jobject obj, jstring jstr)
{
    char buf[256];

    int len = (*env)->GetStringLength(env, jstr);       
    (*env)->GetStringUTFRegion(env, jstr, 0, len, buf);
    (*env)->MonitorEnter(env, obj); // I don't think this is correct.
    strcat(buffer, buf); // buffer is declared as global char buffer[256];
    (*env)->MonitorExit(env, obj);
}

EDIT: How about this? syncobj is defined in Activity as static Object and shared with another thread.

JNIEXPORT void JNICALL Java_company_com_HelloActivity_setBuffer(JNIEnv *env, jobject obj, jstring jstr, jobject syncobj)
{
    char buf[256];

    int len = (*env)->GetStringLength(env, jstr);       
    (*env)->GetStringUTFRegion(env, jstr, 0, len, buf);
    (*env)->MonitorEnter(env, syncobj);
    strcat(buffer, buf);
    (*env)->MonitorExit(env, syncobj);
}
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It is exactly the same as in this Java code:

synchronized (syncobj) // = MonitorEnter(env, syncobj)
{
  // ...
} // = MonitorExit(env, syncobj)
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Your first snippet is an equivalent of synchronized(this), the second snippet is synchronized(syncobj). But both snippets make sense only if the other thread accessing your buffer can see either this or syncobj. I am afraid that the other thread is a native one. Why else you would create the buffer in native code then? If i am correct, then MonitorEnter/Exit is unnecessarily arcane - you could use it but the other native thread would need to hold a global reference to this or syncobj. Native locking seems like much cleaner solution. You are locking native resource, not JVM resource.

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Thank you. But, I don't understand your answer clearly. I know the first snippet is wrong solution. But, I think the second snippet is right solution. buffer is global. Thread A appends characters at buffer and Thread B takes out characters from buffer. I only showed append part. I created synobj as static in Thread A and passes it to append part. Thread B gets syobj from Thread A and passes it to take out part. –  user1301568 Jul 30 '12 at 15:12
    
I don't know what navtive thread means. I created thread by new MyThread() which is extended from Thread in Java. –  user1301568 Jul 30 '12 at 15:22
    
So your both producer (A) and consumer (B) on the buffer are Java threads? –  Pavel Zdenek Jul 30 '12 at 17:13
    
Yes. They are both Java threads. –  user1301568 Jul 30 '12 at 18:06
1  
So then yes, first one won't do because for two different threads, jobject obj is two different objects so mutual access is not ensured. Question stands, why do you need to create the buffer native when both producer and consumer are Java threads, and even if so, why simple synchronized native methods aren't good enough for you. –  Pavel Zdenek Jul 30 '12 at 20:32
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