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Just playing around with queries and examples to get a better understanding of joins. I'm noticing that in SQL Server 2008, the following two queries give the same results:

SELECT * FROM TableA
FULL OUTER JOIN TableB
ON TableA.name = TableB.name

SELECT * FROM TableA
FULL JOIN TableB
ON TableA.name = TableB.name

Are these performing exactly the same action to produce the same results, or would I run into different results in a more complicated example? Is this just interchangeable terminology?

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did you try it? –  John Woo Jul 30 '12 at 3:04
    
Yes, both queries give me the same results in SQL Server 2008 R2. –  CptSupermrkt Jul 30 '12 at 3:05
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2 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Actually they are the same. LEFT OUTER JOIN is same as LEFT JOIN and RIGHT OUTER JOIN is same as RIGHT JOIN. It is more informative way to compare from INNER Join. But only SQL Server understands outer (SQL-92 keyword). other dbms use LEFT JOIN only instead of LEFT OUTER JOIN

SEE HERE for more types of joins

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Perfect, thanks. So many tutorials I've come across use these according to their own style, without making note that they are the same. –  CptSupermrkt Jul 30 '12 at 3:11
    
I think you should correct this. Almost all DBMS understand the OUTER keyword. At least Postgres, Oracle, MySQL, SQLite, DB2, even Access. Actually I know no DBMS that does not accept it. –  ypercube May 11 '13 at 16:46
    
visual representation of joins: codeproject.com/Articles/33052/… –  Hawkeye Parker Nov 12 '13 at 0:30
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Microsoft® SQL Server™ 2000 uses these SQL-92 keywords for outer joins specified in a FROM clause:

  • LEFT OUTER JOIN or LEFT JOIN

  • RIGHT OUTER JOIN or RIGHT JOIN

  • FULL OUTER JOIN or FULL JOIN

From MSDN

The full outer join or full join returns all rows from both tables, matching up the rows wherever a match can be made and placing NULLs in the places where no matching row exists.

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