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When I type in is.seekg(0), it takes me to the beginning of my stream. But, when I type in is.seekg(ios::end) it takes me to the second character. Why does that happen. I think my misunderstanding of this is rooted in a fundamental lack of understanding about how streams work. I would think that when you provide the constant ios::end it would take you to the end of that stream. But, it seems as though it moves you one character forward.

  cin.seekg(0, ios::end);
  int length = cin.tellg();
  cout << length << endl;

  cin.seekg(0);

  cout << cin.tellg();

When I input < file containing "123456789"

The output is 10 0

Now if I do this :

  cin.seekg(ios::end);
  int length = cin.tellg();
  cout << length << endl;

The output is 2

Why is that?

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3 Answers 3

You are converting something of type std::ios_base::seekdir to the type std::istream::pos_type, and invoking the version of seekg that only takes one argument. That version of seekg moves the pointer to an absolute position, not a relative position.

ios::end is a logical position used for the relative offset, not an absolute position.

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This code just works by accident

cin.seekg(ios::end);
int length = cin.tellg();
cout << length << endl; 

the value end comes from an enum seekdir {beg, cur, end};, so ios::end just happens to be convertible to an integer with the value 2.

It is just unfortunate that the parameter to one overload of seekg is an integer, so that the call turns into cin.seekg(2). While technically valid code, this is definitely not what you want.

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You can't rely on STDIN being seekable. This is because it can come from a number of sources, including pipes which are definitely not seekable. Chances are it worked when you redirected the file because the STDIN got tied to a file stream. I don't know if you can rely on that, but that's my guess. I've never even considered seeking on STDIN. I always consider it to be a pipe, even when it's not. Same with STDOUT. I wouldn't output something and then try to backtrack and 'overwrite' that output. If you find yourself needing to seek in the standard streams, you should probably rethink your approach.

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