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Application Receive SIGSEGV Signal

(
"0 libsystem_c.dylib _sigtramp + 38 ",
"1 PConlineBrowser PConlineBrowser + 426343 ",
"2 PConlineBrowser PConlineBrowser + 425831 ",
"3 PConlineBrowser PConlineBrowser + 426725 ",
"4 PConlineBrowser PConlineBrowser + 424051 ",
"5 Foundation __NSFireTimer + 144 ",
"6 CoreFoundation __CFRUNLOOP_IS_CALLING_OUT_TO_A_TIMER_CALLBACK_FUNCTION__ + 14 ",
"7 CoreFoundation __CFRunLoopDoTimer + 364 ",
"8 CoreFoundation __CFRunLoopRun + 1206 ",
"9 CoreFoundation CFRunLoopRunSpecific + 300 ",
"10 CoreFoundation CFRunLoopRunInMode + 104 ",
"11 GraphicsServices GSEventRunModal + 136 ",
"12 UIKit UIApplicationMain + 1080 ",
"13 PConlineBrowser PConlineBrowser + 7771 ",
"14 PConlineBrowser PConlineBrowser + 5144 "
)

heres a pile of back trace info about my app, the numbers on the right side bother me, do they really mean something?

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Yes, they do, but not to you. They are the address offsets of the instructions in the binary that they were called from. –  borrrden Jul 30 '12 at 3:22
1  
possible duplicate of What is the number next to the method name in a stack trace? –  rob mayoff Jul 30 '12 at 4:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You get these for stack frames where you don't have detailed debugging information. Since the only information the debugger has for these libraries is the entry point ( AKA start of the function), it can only give you the start of the function plus an offset ( well actually, it could just give you the raw address, but that would be completely useless).

If you look at the frame in the debugger, in assembler, you can see where in the machine code the error occurred, so if you enjoy debugging assembler, this would be of use to you.

In practice, they are pretty much useless unless you need to send them off to apple, who do have the symbolic information to convert these to a line number.

Sometimes you get these for your own functions. This would suggest that you don't have the symbols available because they've been stripped. If you get a dump back from a device and look at it in a text editor, it might look like this. The answer is to open dumps in the organiser, which will try and find a matching archive and use the symbol file from it to convert the offsets to line numbers for you.

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