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I'm not getting the result expect from the following code:

#!/bash/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my @file;
my $file2;

open (IN, "+</home/opmeitle/labs-perl/numbers");
@file = <IN>;
seek IN,0,0;

my %change = ( 80.928 => "85.950", 320.000  => "380.500");
my $changekey = join "|", keys %change;

foreach $file2 (@file){
$file2 =~ s/($changekey)/$change{$1}/g;
print IN $file2;}
close IN;

This is the contents of /home/opmeitle/labs-perl/numbers:

80.928
320.000

Here is the output:

85.950
380.500.000

Here is the result I desire:

85.950
380.500

I appreciate your answers.

luis.

but, looking this example, change in file numbers 80.928 and 320.000 for "Hola, mi nombre es Luis y vivo en Argentina" in code my %change = ( nombre => "name", mi => "my"); this is result "Hola, my name es Luis y vivo en Argentina a " in the end , an word the more! because?

share|improve this question
    
hi, i'm needing, change in file, key for the values, hash –  opmeitle Jul 30 '12 at 4:37
    
you need to paste some sample from '/home/opmeitle/labs-perl/numeros' –  René Kolařík Jul 30 '12 at 4:39
    
I understand, but you're reading the input file, performing some transformation, and then writing to the file. So unless we know what the input looks like, we can't very well explain what your transform should be doing to get the desired output. Edit your question by pasting the relevant input. –  DavidO Jul 30 '12 at 4:39
    
maybe your $file2 is 320.000.000, as that you may get the result 380.500.000 –  cdtits Jul 30 '12 at 4:43
2  
Also: You need to call truncate in case the new file is smaller than the old one. –  ikegami Jul 30 '12 at 5:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your first problem is in . (dot) . (dot) - in regular expression means "any symbol".

Your second problem in 320.000 -- this is the number and it's exactly equals to 320

320.000 =~ s/320/380.500/g; => 380.500.000

I suppose that solution may be in changing type of hash keys from numbers to strings and escape all dots '.' => '\.'

To support my point of view, I wrote small script:

#!/usr/bin/perl

my %change = ( 80.928 => "85.950", 320.000  => "380.500");
my $changekey = join "|", keys %change;

print $changekey;

And voila, it produces output: 320|80.928

But when %change hash is written as my %change = ( "80.928" => "85.950", "320.000" => "380.500");, output would be 320.000|80.928

And the third problem, you open file in read-write mode, but when resulting file has less size then source, at the end would be rubbish. To avoid this, you must use truncate, or open file in readonly mode, read it, close, and after that open it in writeonly mode.

share|improve this answer
    
but, looking this example, change in file numbers 80.928 and 320.000 for "Hola, mi nombre es Luis y vivo en Argentina" in code my %change = ( nombre => "name", mi => "my"); this is result "Hola, my name es Luis y vivo en Argentina a " in the end , an word the more! because? –  opmeitle Jul 30 '12 at 4:53
    
How about this: '320.000' =~ s/320.000/380.500/g; –  cdtits Jul 30 '12 at 4:58
    
I understand your code, but not work with word, the more. –  opmeitle Jul 30 '12 at 5:06
    
helped me, thanks! but remember this code modified; change in file numbers 80.928 and 320.000 for "Hola, mi nombre es Luis y vivo en Argentina" in code my %change = ( nombre => "name", mi => "my"); this is result "Hola, my name es Luis y vivo en Argentina a " in the end , an word the more! –  opmeitle Jul 30 '12 at 5:17
    
As @CyberDem0n (and ikegami in a comment) mentioned, truncate is also useful here. But frankly, I seldom find it useful to open a file in '+<' mode. It just adds unneeded complexity. Your solution could read one file line by line, process that line, output it to a different file, and in the end, pull a switcheroo with the filenames. No need for seek, no truncate, no writing to the same file you're trying to read, no worrying about whether any of the lines consumes more (or less) bytes after being altered than the original. KISS should stand for "Keeping It Simple is Smarter". –  DavidO Jul 30 '12 at 6:22

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