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I have a 2 dimensional array

v = [ ["ab","12"], ["ab","31"], ["gh","54"] ]

The first element of the subarray of v will have repeating elements, such as "ab". I want to create a hash that puts the key as the first element of the subarray, and values as an array of corresponding second elements from v.

please advice.

Further, I want this, h={"ab"=>["12","31"],"gh"=>["54"]} and then I want to return h.values, such that the array [["12","31"],["54"]] is returned

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
v.inject(Hash.new{|h,k|h[k]=[]}) { |h, (k, v)| h[k] << v ; h}

What it does:

  • inject (also called reduce) is a fold. Wikipedia defines folds like this: "a family of higher-order functions that analyze a recursive data structure and recombine through use of a given combining operation the results of recursively processing its constituent parts, building up a return value".

  • The block form of Hash.new takes two arguments, the hash itself and the key. If your default argument is a mutable object, you have to set the default this way, otherwise all keys will point to the same array instance.

  • In inject's block, we get two arguments, the hash and the current value of the iteration. Since this is a two element array, (k, v) is used to destructure the latter into two variables.

  • Finally we add each value to the array for its key and return the entire hash for the next iteration.

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Thanks Michael. –  Selvam Jul 30 '12 at 13:02
    
If this is the answer you were looking for you should accept it with the little tick mark below the up-/downvote arrows. –  Michael Kohl Jul 30 '12 at 13:03
    
I undertand most part of the code. Please explain this. In the inject>parameter>block what is the h,k and how it works? –  Selvam Jul 30 '12 at 13:13
    
It's explained in the third bullet point... inject's second argument would be the current element of the collection v. Since those are two element arrays themselves, I split them up in two different variables, called k (for key) and v (for value), but of course the names are arbitrary. –  Michael Kohl Jul 30 '12 at 13:14
    
And when I do (v.inject(Hash.new{|h,k|h[k]=[]}) { |h, (k, v)| h[k] << v ; h}).values, it only returns the last value. Why? –  Selvam Jul 30 '12 at 13:20
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v.inject({­}) do |res,­ ar|
  res[ar.fir­st] ||= []
  res[ar.fir­st] << ar.la­st
  res
end
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Thanks Erez Rabih. –  Selvam Jul 30 '12 at 6:58
    
I want this, h={"ab"=>["12","31"],"gh"=>["54"]} and then I want to return h.values, such that the array [["12","31"],["54"]] is returned. –  Selvam Jul 30 '12 at 7:24
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v = [ ["ab","12"], ["ab","31"], ["gh","54"] ]

This gets you a hash, where the keys are the unique first elements from the sub arrays.

h = v.inject({}) { |c,i| (c[i.first] ||= []) << i.last; c }

This turns that hash back into an array, just in case you need the array of arrays format.

arr = h.collect { |k,v| [k,v] }
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Hey Ctcherry, please explain what's happening here. I am new to ruby. –  Selvam Jul 30 '12 at 6:57
    
Hey Ctcheery, what this does is h={"ab"=>"12","ab"=>"31","gh"=>"54"} but what I want is this h={"ab"=>["12","31"],"gh"=>["54"]} and then I want to return h.values, such that the array [["12","31"],["54"]] is returned. –  Selvam Jul 30 '12 at 7:21
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