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When providing script to customers, Script will not execute unless they did set-executionpolicy.

What is the common practice when providing a script to customers?

Whether set-executionpolicy would be run as first command in script so that it would execute without any error or some documents will be captured about set-executionpolicy.

I am giving powershell script first time to our customers. Previously i simply use to execute in our environment so i did not think about it.

Some one please help me to get some light on this

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@manojlds answer is exactly what I would do, just a side comment: putting Set-ExecutionPolicy as a first line in your script makes hardly any sense, it won't run anyway. I would also suggest using valid certificate and signing your script, so that if they use AllSigned, your script will work w/o batch. Mind that if that is configured with GPO - -ExecutionPolicy switch on powershell.exe won't help you. –  BartekB Jul 30 '12 at 7:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

One approach:

Also a send a bat file as a wrapper to the .ps1 which will do something like:

@powershell -ExecutionPolicy RemoteSigned -File script.ps1
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I like this approach because it doesn't slam the user's execution policy to a new value without them knowing about it. It just sets the execution policy for the script that is about to run. –  Keith Hill Jul 30 '12 at 15:05

If I am providing a script to a customer, I'll digitially sign it and recommend that they consider using the REMOTESIGNED execution policy.

For most admins, though, I normally recommend UNRESTRICTED. These admins have sufficient power, making them jump through hoops to run code seems a waste of time. At the end of the day, they can ALWAYS run the code via one way or the other - so why waste time making signing a requirement.

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