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This is the piece of code.

List<BDDObject> childlist = savingObject.getChildren("TherapyAreaReference");

if (childlist.size() > 1) {
  for (int i = 0; i < childlist.size() - 1; i++) {
    String newMedcondRefChild = ((String) childlist
            .get(i)
            .getValue( IDDConstants.IDD_THERAPY_AREA_REF_VALUE))
            .toLowerCase()
            .trim()
            .concat(((String) childlist
            .get(i)
            .getValue(IDDConstants.IDD_THERAPY_AREA_REF_TYPE_NAME)) 
            .toLowerCase().trim());
  }
}

IDDConstants has public static final strings defined in it. As StringBuffer is more effective, how can it be incorporated for the concat operations?

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Is this code Java? –  user647772 Jul 30 '12 at 7:07
    
yes. it's in java. –  dev Jul 30 '12 at 8:39
2  
Did you even try to read the documentation? docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/lang/… –  Vitaliy Jul 30 '12 at 8:45
2  
First, you should use a for-each-loop and some additional local variables to make your code more readable/understandable. –  Philipp Wendler Jul 30 '12 at 8:55
1  
were you helped by the answers? –  maasg Jul 31 '12 at 12:04
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'm guessing that the intention is to generate a list of 'reports', one for each BDDObject record found. Based on that idea, your code should look more like this:

public List<String> getReport(List<BDDObject> records) {
List<String> reports = new ArrayList<String>(record.size());
    for (BDDObject record:records) {
    String newMedcondRefChild = String.valueOf(record.getValue( IDDConstants.IDD_THERAPY_AREA_REF_VALUE))
            .toLowerCase()
            .trim() + String.valueOf(record.getValue(IDDConstants.IDD_THERAPY_AREA_REF_TYPE_NAME))) 
            .toLowerCase().trim());
    reports.add(newMedcondRefChild);
    }
    return reports;
}

Regarding the question on whether toString() would be helpful, the only place where I see it fitting, would be on the BDDObject itself. It would look something like this:

class BDDObject {
...
    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return String.valueOf(getValue(IDDConstants.IDD_THERAPY_AREA_REF_VALUE)).toLowerCase().trim() + 
            String.valueOf(getValue(IDDConstants.IDD_THERAPY_AREA_REF_TYPE_NAME)).toLowerCase().trim());
}

In which case, the function to create the report becomes trivial:

public List<String> getReport(List<BDDObject> records) {
List<String> reports = new ArrayList<String>(record.size());
    for (BDDObject record:records) {
        reports.add(record.toString());
    }
    return reports;
}

In case that what you want is a looooong string with all the values concatenated to it, you can use StringBuilder, like this:

public String getReport(List<BDDObject> records) {
StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    for (BDDObject record:records) {
        sb.append(String.valueOf(record.getValue( IDDConstants.IDD_THERAPY_AREA_REF_VALUE))
            .toLowerCase()
            .trim());
        sb.append(String.valueOf(record.getValue(IDDConstants.IDD_THERAPY_AREA_REF_TYPE_NAME)) 
            .toLowerCase().trim()));

    }
    return sb.toString();
}

This will return all the records appended after each other. I doubt its readability, but you I hope you get the idea. StringBuilder is helpful when you need to build a string iteratively (like in the previous example). StringBuilder should not be used to replace single String operations like : String a = b.get() + c.get(); given that the compiler implicitly creates a StringBuilder in these cases and therefore there's no actual performance improvement to be achieved.

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In the code in your question, StringBuffer/StringBuilder will not give you any performance gains, because you concatenate only two strings. However, the question does not state what you are doing with the string in newMedconfRefChild. If your actual goal is to concatenate the strings of each loop iteration, then you should use a StringBuilder (use StringBuffer only when it is really necessary, prefer StringBuilder).

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1  
If you don't want synchronization while editing strings, then use StringBuilder - it is faster. –  popfalushi Jul 30 '12 at 9:41
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