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I have to extend the size of JTextField on KeyPressed event as user enter the text in textfield.please give me some idea how to achieve this?

thanks in advance

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4  
please explain what you really want to achieve - a keyPress is not necessarily fired when the user enters text (f.i. by pasting) –  kleopatra Jul 30 '12 at 9:23
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4 Answers

Okay, jumping for it :-)

Let's assume the question is

How to adjust a JTextField's width to always fit its content width?

Usual collaborators

  • a LayoutManager which sizes its children at their pref size, f.i. FlowLayout
  • JTextField reports its pref size fitted to content
  • auto-magical resize expected

Quick example:

JTextField field = new JTextField("something");
JComponent parent = new JPanel(); // has FlowLayout by default
parent.add(field);
frame.add(parent);
// just to ensure it's bigger 
frame.setSize(400, 400);

type ... and nothing happens: size remains at initial size. That's surprise: for some reason, the field's auto-validation simply doesnt't happen. In fact, a manual revalidate of the field on receiving a change notification (Note: the only correct listener type here is a DocumentListener) doesn't change the field as well:

final JTextField field = new JTextField("something");
DocumentListener l = new DocumentListener() {

    private void updateField(JTextField field)
        // has no effect
        field.revalidate();
    }


    @Override
    public void removeUpdate(DocumentEvent e) {
        updateField(field);
    }

    @Override
    public void insertUpdate(DocumentEvent e) {
        updateField(field);
    }

    @Override
    public void changedUpdate(DocumentEvent e) {
   }
};

field.getDocument().addDocumentListener(l);
JComponent parent = new JPanel(); // has FlowLayout by default
parent.add(field);
frame.add(parent);
// just to ensure it's bigger 
frame.setSize(400, 400);

@Gagandeep Bali found out that it's the parent that needs to be revalidated:

private void updateField(JTextField field) {
    field.getParent().revalidate();
}

Unexpected, so the next question is the notorious why? Here: why doesn't the invalidate bubble up the container hierarchy until it finds a validateRoot? The answer is in the api doc:

Calls to revalidate that come from within the textfield itself will be handled by validating the textfield, unless the textfield is contained within a JViewport, in which case this returns false.

Or in other words: it's not bubbled up because the field itself is a validateRoot. Which leaves the other option to override and unconditionally return false:

JTextField field = new JTextField("something") {

    @Override
    public boolean isValidateRoot() {
        return false;
    }
};
JComponent parent = new JPanel(); // has FlowLayout by default
parent.add(field);
frame.add(parent);
// just to ensure it's bigger 
frame.setSize(400, 400);

The price to pay for this, is that the scrolling doesn't work - which isn't a big deal in this context, as the text always fits into the field. Or implement slightly more intelligent, and return true if the actual width is less than the pref.

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1  
This has more insight into it, no doubt :-) –  nIcE cOw Jul 30 '12 at 14:03
    
+1 for an extended explanation –  MadProgrammer Jul 30 '12 at 19:20
    
+1 for having a correct-sized noze, and +1 for re-discovering isValidateRoot for me (seems to be a periodically re-appearing, exotic API detail which you don't need if you know it, and don't know about when you need it). (doh, still no +1 +1 possible :( ) –  TheBlastOne Jul 31 '12 at 8:39
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The best way I can think of is to add one CaretListener to the JTextField concerned, and with the change in the length of the Document, you Increase/Decrease the columns of the said JTextField by calling it's setColumns(...), which inturn will Increase/Decrease the size of the JTextField

Here is one example to show you, how to achieve this :

import java.awt.*;
import javax.swing.*;
import javax.swing.event.CaretEvent;
import javax.swing.event.CaretListener;

public class JTextFieldColumnExample
{
    private int columns = 1;
    private JTextField tfield;

    private void displayGUI()
    {
        JFrame frame =  new JFrame("JTextField Columns Example");
        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);

        final JPanel contentPane = new JPanel();
        tfield = new JTextField();
        tfield.setColumns(columns);
        tfield.addCaretListener(new CaretListener()
        {
            public void caretUpdate(CaretEvent ce)
            {
                int len = tfield.getDocument().getLength();
                if (len > columns)
                    tfield.setColumns(++columns);
                else
                {
                    if (--columns != 0)
                        tfield.setColumns(columns);
                    else
                    {
                        columns = 1;
                        tfield.setColumns(columns);
                    }   
                }   
                contentPane.revalidate();
                contentPane.repaint();
            }
        });

        contentPane.add(tfield);

        frame.setContentPane(contentPane);
        frame.pack();
        frame.setLocationByPlatform(true);
        frame.setVisible(true);
    }

    public static void main(String... args)
    {
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable()
        {
            public void run()
            {
                new JTextFieldColumnExample().displayGUI();
            }
        });
    }
}
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No you have to set the Columns, simply adding it to the FlowLayout, won't increase it's view area, though you can add stuff to it. But in order to increase the view area you have to update it's Column value, this time it's really not fair to downvote this one :( –  nIcE cOw Jul 30 '12 at 11:59
1  
doohhh ... you are right, was sure I've seen that self-increase, sorry –  kleopatra Jul 30 '12 at 12:08
    
even weirder: the revalidate on the parent is really needed (though not the repaint, afaics) BTW: the caretListener is not what you want - it's not necessarily firing, f.i. not if an insert happens at a position > caretPosition –  kleopatra Jul 30 '12 at 12:36
    
+1 for not being kleopatra's answer, and not being totally wrong :-) –  TheBlastOne Jul 31 '12 at 8:41
    
@TheBlastOne : Thankyou and KEEP SMILING :-) Trying my BEST to keep my pace with her, though I always fall short :-) –  nIcE cOw Jul 31 '12 at 10:14
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1) never to use KeyListener for JTextComponent, use DocumentListener, nothing else

2) you can to use FontMetrics, TextLayout, SwingUtilities

3) after resize you have to notify LayoutManager,

4) if is there only JTextField then to use pack() for Top-Level Container,

5) otherwise (in the case that there is more than one JPanel nested other JComponents) you have to re_layout whole Container with revalidate()and repaint() then

  • call pack() to the Top-Level Container if you want to resize continiously with its contens

  • don't call pack() to the Top-Level Container if you don't want to resize, but required usage of JScrollPane

6) in the case that value of String could be very long, then to use proper JTextComponent with supporting multiline output to the GUI, to use JTextArea (in JScrollPane) rather than plain JTextField

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I would disagree (in this case) about the KeyListener. If we were manipulating the text, absolutely, use a DocumentListener. Forgive, I'm curious as to why to why you suggest this (I may not know something you do ;)). I do however, agree with point 6! –  MadProgrammer Jul 30 '12 at 8:19
    
@MadProgrammer everything :-) is described in the 1st point, there it would be poor consolation that JTextField has focus and have accepting that JTextField has Mouse, Focus, Caret and keyboard, both answers here covering only one quater of :-), then I leaving any voting comment e.g. in this thread .... –  mKorbel Jul 30 '12 at 8:48
    
aaand both you are most voted posters here.... , have to accepting that you'll some up and down votes too –  mKorbel Jul 30 '12 at 8:52
    
arggghhh ... those long bullet lists again ... 1) okay 2) not needed 3) no 4) maybe but not probable 5) no, except for maybe re-sizing the top-level container 6) okay. That's value:noise ratio of 2:4 ;) –  kleopatra Jul 30 '12 at 9:30
    
What? A value:nose value of 2:4, i.e. 1 value, 2 noses? Cooool. ^^ –  TheBlastOne Jul 31 '12 at 8:42
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Depends if you are using a LayoutManager or not. If not, attach a KeyListener to the JTextField and on keyRelease you need to calculate the length of the String (in pixels) and determine if the field needs to be updated

addDocumentListener(new DocumentListener() {

    public void changedUpdate(DocumentEvent e) {
        updateField();
    }

    public void insertUpdate(DocumentEvent e) {
        updateField();
    }

    public void removeUpdate(DocumentEvent e) {
        updateField();
    }

    public void updateField() {

        FontMetrics fm = getFontMetrics(getFont());
        String text = getText();

        int length = fm.stringWidth(text);

        Dimension size = getPreferredSize();
        Insets insets = getInsets();
        if (length < min) {

            size.width = min;

        } else {

            size.width = length + (insets.left + insets.right);

        }

        setSize(size);
        invalidate();
        repaint();

    }

});

Possibly a more sensible solution might be:

addDocumentListener(new DocumentListener() {

    public void changedUpdate(DocumentEvent e) {
        updateField();
    }

    public void insertUpdate(DocumentEvent e) {
        updateField();
    }

    public void removeUpdate(DocumentEvent e) {
        updateField();
    }

    public void updateField() {

        setColumns(getText().length());

    }

});

I would also pay attention to what kleopatra & mKorbel have to say. While KeyListener might seem like a good idea, there are just to many situation's where it won't be notified - setText is the major one.

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no ... and you know it ;-) –  kleopatra Jul 30 '12 at 7:49
    
@kleopatra throws arms in the air What have I done wrong this time :( –  MadProgrammer Jul 30 '12 at 8:17
    
directing newbies into the completely wrong direction, what else ;-) –  kleopatra Jul 30 '12 at 8:58
    
@kleoparra got make you earn your keep ;) help me earn our master, how could we better address the problem (seriously). Your point about pasting text is an excellent one, what else? –  MadProgrammer Jul 30 '12 at 10:12
    
@kleopatra Okay, I've taken on board your feedback and reviewed my answer. I appreciate you feedback on the ideas :) –  MadProgrammer Jul 30 '12 at 10:35
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