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I'm having some trouble with making list of objects based on a condition on an enum. It seems that after I have completed the list, every item in the list is equivalent to the last item.

It's the classic case of different references pointing to the same object, but I don't know how to avoid it:

I've pared things down as much as I can while maintaining readability:

public class Foo {
  Digit[] array = new Digit[2];
  ArrayList<Foo> foozlets;

  Foo() {
    array[0] = Digit.ZERO;
    foozlets = new ArrayList<Foo>();
  }

  Foo(Foo old, Digit num) {
    this.array = old.array;  \\This line is a problem, what should it say?
    array[1] = num;
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    Foo f = new Foo();
    System.out.println("Initial Foo:");
    System.out.println(f);
    f.listFoozlets();
  }

  void listFoozlets() {
    for (Digit k : Digit.values()) {
      if (k == Digit.TWO || k == Digit.FIVE) {
        foozlets.add(new Foo(this, k));
        System.out.println("** Foozlet being added **");
        Foo foo = new Foo(this, k);
        System.out.println(foo);
      }
    }
    System.out.println("** List of Foozlets **");
    for (Foo foo : foozlets) {
        System.out.println(foo);
    }
  }

  public String toString() {
    return array[0].toString() + " " + array[1].toString();
  }
}

enum Digit { ZERO, ONE, TWO, THREE, FOUR, FIVE }

Here is the output:

Initial Foo:
ZERO NULL
** Foozlet being added **
ZERO TWO
** Foozlet being added **
ZERO FIVE
** List of Foozlets **
ZERO FIVE
ZERO FIVE

If someone can explain why the first instance of Foo on the list changes, and how I can make a list that doesn't change, I'd be grateful.

EDIT: Ok, I see where the problem is now. In the real, much larger program, I have a much larger array, and I want to keep the old information when I create a new Foo for the list. I've changed the code to reflect that there is additional information that I want to maintain. How do I accomplish this?

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1  
Regarding your edit, you need to get more specific about your case, as the obvious answer is to clone the array (as Jon and my answer suggests). If the array is very large, then what is the relationship between the old data and the new data? You may need a different data structure altogether to accomplish this well, but since we have no insight into the data being stored and how old and new Foos relate, I can't give any good suggestions. –  Yishai Jul 23 '09 at 13:53

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This bit is the culprit:

Foo(Foo old, Digit num) {
  this.array = old.array;
  array[0] = num;
}

You're copying a reference to the old Foo's array, and then changing the value in that array.

Why do you even have an array of size 1 instead of just a Digit? If you really want the array, you possibly want to clone it instead of just copying the reference, but we can't really tell what the intention is.

Here's a shorter example:

enum Digit { ZERO, ONE, TWO, THREE, FOUR, FIVE }

public class Foo {
  Digit[] array = new Digit[1];

  Foo() {
    array[0] = Digit.ZERO;
  }

  Foo(Foo old, Digit num) {
    this.array = old.array;
    array[0] = num;
  }

  public String toString() {
    return array[0].toString();
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    Foo f = new Foo();
    System.out.println(f);
    Foo other = new Foo(f, Digit.ONE);
    System.out.println(f);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
shorter but same error, still using the same array –  Carlos Heuberger Jul 23 '09 at 13:46
    
Thanks much, clone seems to work for me here. –  Eric Wilson Jul 23 '09 at 13:51
    
@Carlos: That was the whole point - to show a shorter example showing the same problem. –  Jon Skeet Jul 23 '09 at 13:55

In your second constructor:

Foo(Foo old, Digit num) {
  this.array = old.array;
  array[0] = num;
}

You are re-using the list from old. You want to create a copy of that list rather than using the same list. You can do that by changing the assignment to:

Foo(Foo old, Digit num) {
  this.array = new ArrayList<Foo>(old.array);
  array[0] = num;
}
share|improve this answer

The problem appears to be in this line:

    this.array = old.array;

You are sharing array references, so every Foo shares the same array, so they all have the same value at array[0].

To fix this, try:

  this.array = old.array.clone();
share|improve this answer
    
this is the correct sollution, now you clone the contents of the array and can overwrite one of the elements –  Salandur Jul 23 '09 at 14:45

The object reference in this case is the array. The constructor of foo is where you're having the issue, specifically:

Foo(Foo old, Digit num) {
   this.array = old.array; // reference the old array 
   array[0] = num; // set the first element of the array (for this AND the old array) to num
}

You need to copy the array to a new array in the constructor of foo.

share|improve this answer

Instead of

Foo(Foo old, Digit num) {
  this.array = old.array;
  array[0] = num;

}

simply do

Foo(Foo old, Digit num) {
  array[0] = num;

}

if you really need the array at all... (best would be to use a simple Digit as suggested in another reply)

share|improve this answer
    
This works for my example, but I needed some information from the old array. I've altered the example to reflect this. –  Eric Wilson Jul 23 '09 at 14:05

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