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I've stumbled upon something weird. When applying a dashed white border to an element, the colors of the background gradient appear on the wrong side of the element, like so:

wrong border colors

I've seen this in the latest versions of Firefox, Chrome, Opera and in IE10. IE9 has my intented effect, however.

My css is currently:

aside.block { 

    width:                  259px;
    padding:                12px;
    margin:                 15px 0;

    border:                 2px dashed #fff;

    background-image:       -o-linear-gradient(bottom, rgb(219,203,0) 0%, rgb(255,236,0) 100%);
    background-image:       -moz-linear-gradient(bottom, rgb(219,203,0) 0%, rgb(255,236,0) 100%);
    background-image:       -webkit-linear-gradient(bottom, rgb(219,203,0) 0%, rgb(255,236,0) 100%);
    background-image:       -ms-linear-gradient(bottom, rgb(219,203,0) 0%, rgb(255,236,0) 100%);
    background-image:       linear-gradient(bottom, rgb(219,203,0) 0%, rgb(255,236,0) 100%);
    filter:                 progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient(startColorstr='#ffec00', endColorstr='#dbcb00');

}

The border colors on the left and right side color fine, but since this happens in pretty much every browser, I'll have to assume this is my mistake, not a browser bug. What am I missing here?

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1  
Added to fiddle so it's easier to mess around: jsfiddle.net/LVfqe/5 –  easwee Jul 30 '12 at 8:55
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can fix this by setting background-origin to border-box.

http://jsfiddle.net/LVfqe/11/

.block{
        width:                  259px;
        padding:                12px;
        background-image:       -o-linear-gradient(bottom, rgb(219,203,0) 0%, rgb(255,236,0) 100%);
        background-image:       -moz-linear-gradient(bottom, rgb(219,203,0) 0%, rgb(255,236,0) 100%);
        background-image:       -webkit-linear-gradient(bottom, rgb(219,203,0) 0%, rgb(255,236,0) 100%);
        background-image:       -ms-linear-gradient(bottom, rgb(219,203,0) 0%, rgb(255,236,0) 100%);
        background-image:       linear-gradient(bottom, rgb(219,203,0) 0%, rgb(255,236,0) 100%);
        filter:progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient(startColorstr='#ffec00',endColorstr='#dbcb00');
border:                 2px dashed #fff;
background-origin:border-box;
}
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Ah, that fixes it. I don't think I've ever used the background-origin property before. –  Lg102 Jul 30 '12 at 9:08
1  
What's the reason of the original behavior? Provide a beveled border ? –  Stefano Borini Jul 30 '12 at 9:14
    
@Stefano Borini - what do you mean by "beveled border". What is that? The problem occurs because the default background-origin is padding-box and background is set to repeat. The gradient starts to repeat under the border unless border-box is set - which will count border into total box width and start background there. Try setting border-width to 50px and you will see why. –  easwee Jul 30 '12 at 12:29
    
In the sense that the borders use a different shading to give the impression of a 3d entity (using the illusion of light on top our brain assumes to be true). –  Stefano Borini Jul 30 '12 at 12:39
    
@Stefano Borini - nop - it has nothing to do with border at all. You can see this only because the border is dashed (note border color is white). What you see is the bottom of the gradient repeating under the top border (and top of the gradient repeating under the bottom border). If you want to remove this behaviour just set background-repeat:no-repeat;. I doubt there's a reason for this - it's just default css settings. –  easwee Jul 30 '12 at 13:28
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