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This question already has an answer here:

I know there isn't one in the BCL but can anyone point me to a good opensource one?

By Multi I mean 2 keys. ;-)

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marked as duplicate by nawfal, Chris Haas, Pierre-Luc Pineault, karthik, Sriram Sakthivel May 20 at 6:14

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Do you want a key that is made of multiple attributes or do you want it possible so that the same key can exist more than once in the same dictionary? These are different. –  Polaris878 Jul 23 '09 at 13:50
2  
    
You might want to add an example usage, to clarify what you mean. –  Michael Donohue Jul 23 '09 at 14:21
2  
    
no +1 for making the question this short and vague. Your question can be implied in 10 different ways –  nawfal Mar 28 '13 at 10:21
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16 Answers

I also use tuples as Jason does. However, I suggest you simply define a tuple as a struct:

public struct Tuple<T1, T2> {
    public readonly T1 Item1;
    public readonly T2 Item2;
    public Tuple(T1 item1, T2 item2) { Item1 = item1; Item2 = item2;} 
}

public static class Tuple { // for type-inference goodness.
    public static Tuple<T1,T2> Create<T1,T2>(T1 item1, T2 item2) { 
        return new Tuple<T1,T2>(item1, item2); 
    }
}

You get immutability, .GetHashcode and .Equals for free, which (while you're waiting for C# 4.0) is nice 'n simple...

One warning however: the default GetHashcode implementation (sometimes) only considers the first field so make sure to make the first field the most discriminating or implement GetHashcode yourself, otherwise you'll likely run into scalability issues.

Also, you get to avoid nulls which tend to complicate matters (and if you really want nulls, you just make your Tuple<> nullable). Slightly offtopic, am I the only one annoyed at the framework-level lack of support for non-null references? I work on large project, and occasionally a null creeps in somewhere it really shouldn't -- and hey presto, you get a nullreference exception -- but with a stack trace that points you to the reference's first usage, not the actually faulty code.

Of course, .NET 4.0 is pretty old by now; most of use can just use .NET 4.0's tuple.

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2  
Nice blurb on reference versus value-type decision for tuples in .NET: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/dd942829.aspx#id0400060 –  Jason Jul 23 '09 at 14:03
1  
@nawfal: I decided to reimplement the hashcode function generator. It works; but it's still pretty barebones: github.com/EamonNerbonne/ValueUtils –  Eamon Nerbonne May 27 at 8:49
1  
@EamonNerbonne looks good. I'm not very sure about OverriddenHashCodeMethod's job. Will have to test. –  nawfal May 27 at 9:09
1  
@nawfal: I'll polish it up and add more features, and release it to nuget. If you actually intend to use this, I'd love feedback on how to make it work for your usecase - feel free to comment on github! –  Eamon Nerbonne May 27 at 10:01
1  
@nawfal: OK, I think it's in a pretty usable state now. I'd be interested in your opinion on two specific design issues: github.com/EamonNerbonne/ValueUtils/issues/1 and github.com/EamonNerbonne/ValueUtils/issues/2. Even so, this is ready for real use - just try refering to nuget:ValueUtils, and create your class ala sealed class MyClass : ValueObject<MyClass>! Early perf testing shows it to be much faster than ValueType, considerably faster than Tuple<>, and within a factor 2 of hand-rolled code. –  Eamon Nerbonne May 29 at 19:01
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I use a Tuple as the keys in a Dictionary.

public class Tuple<T1, T2> {
    public T1 Item1 { get; private set; }
    public T2 Item2 { get; private set; }

    // implementation details
}

Be sure to override Equals and GetHashCode and define operator!= and operator== as appropriate. You can expand the Tuple to hold more items as needed. .NET 4.0 will include a built-in Tuple.

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2  
Check out this blog post on performance tests between multiple "multi-key" dictionary implementations here –  Aron W. Apr 22 '13 at 21:13
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Tuples will be (are) in .Net 4.0 Until then, you can also use a

 Dictionary<key1, Dictionary<key2, TypeObject>>

or, creating a custom collection class to represent this...

 public class TwoKeyDictionary<K1, K2, T>: 
        Dictionary<K1, Dictionary<K2, T>> { }

or, with three keys...

public class ThreeKeyDictionary<K1, K2, K3, T> :
    Dictionary<K1, Dictionary<K2, Dictionary<K3, T>>> { }
share|improve this answer
    
Brilliant answer -- this worked perfectly for my needs. –  HanClinto Dec 6 '12 at 7:04
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Is there anything wrong with

new Dictionary<KeyValuePair<object, object>, object>
?

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3  
Is there a built-in Pair<T1, T2> class? –  Michael Donohue Jul 23 '09 at 13:53
    
@MichaelDonohue: As of .NET 4.0, there is the Tuple class. –  Matthew May 20 '13 at 18:20
    
Yes, there is something wrong: KVP uses ValueType.GetHashCode - "If you call the derived type's GetHashCode method, the return value is not likely to be suitable for use as a key in a hash table." KVP is a completely inappropriate choice for a Dictionary key and could yield many collisions. –  bacar Aug 5 '13 at 23:13
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Take a look at Wintellect's PowerCollections (CodePlex download). I think their MultiDictionary does something like that.

It's a dictionary of dictionaries, so you have 2 keys to access each object, the key for the main dictionary to get you the required sub dictionary, and then the second key for the sub dictionary to get you the required item. Is that what you mean?

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Their MultiDictionary<,> allows to assign multiple values to a single key, not to have multiple keys in this sense. –  pbalaga Aug 29 '12 at 11:57
    
but OP's question is as vague as it can get. Hence +1 for a different take. –  nawfal Mar 28 '13 at 10:25
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I frequently use this because it's short and provides the syntactic sugar I need...

public class MultiKeyDictionary<T1, T2, T3> : Dictionary<T1, Dictionary<T2, T3>>
{
    new public Dictionary<T2, T3> this[T1 key]
    {
        get
        {
            if (!ContainsKey(key))
                Add(key, new Dictionary<T2, T3>());

            Dictionary<T2, T3> returnObj;
            TryGetValue(key, out returnObj);

            return returnObj;
        }
    }
}

To use it:

dict[cat][fish] = 9000;

where the "Cat" key doesn't have to exist either.

share|improve this answer
    
I should also mention that it's arbitrary to create further nestings with another class <T1, T2, T3, T4> : Dictionary<T1, MultiKeyDictionary<T2, T3>>, etc. Also, I avoid using it, but it cleans up funky nested dictionaries pretty well. –  MaxWell Dec 17 '12 at 18:54
    
What's a good way to check if the [cat][fish] or [cat][mouse] keys exist? –  goku_da_master Dec 18 '12 at 0:54
    
@goku_da_master dict[cat].ContainsKey(mouse) where if cat doesn't exist, you always get false, because it is newed up then. If you're using it this way a lot I would benchmark it though--it's not going to be a very optimized way of doing this. –  MaxWell Dec 18 '12 at 18:02
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I've googled for this one: http://www.codeproject.com/KB/recipes/multikey-dictionary.aspx. I guess it's main feature compared to using struct to contain 2 keys in regular dictionary is that you can later reference by one of the keys, instead of having to supply 2 keys.

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I'm currently simply concatenating the keys into a single string as a workaround. Of course, this will not work on non-string keys. Would love to know the answer as well.

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3  
Because on most class .ToSting() will be the same for all values (ie. the types name). Not all types have a valid string representation, etc, etc. –  Matthew Scharley Jul 23 '09 at 13:47
1  
Then, one cannot use sealed classes as keys, and instead of implementing one class which is a tuple of many, one must subclass many classes. –  maxwellb Jul 23 '09 at 13:55
1  
Yeah, too many BCL classes don't implement ToString, which means you can't assume ToString will return a unique representation of a given type's state. TL;DR: fail –  Will Jul 23 '09 at 13:57
5  
Using string concatenation can be dangerous. For example, if you have ints 123 and 456, and concatenate them to create a key, this would give "123456". If you have 12 and 3456 and you concatenate them, you get... "123456". Oops. –  Meta-Knight Jul 23 '09 at 14:07
6  
@Meta-Knight Use separator. Duh. –  Adrian Godong Jul 23 '09 at 15:46
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Here's a fleshed out example of a pair class which can be used as the key to a Dictionary.

  public class Pair<T1, T2> {
    public T1 Left { get; private set; }
    public T2 Right { get; private set; }

    public Pair(T1 t1, T2 t2) {
      Left=t1;
      Right=t2;
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj) {
      if(ReferenceEquals(null, obj)) return false;
      if(ReferenceEquals(this, obj)) return true;
      if(obj.GetType()!=typeof(Pair<T1, T2>)) return false;
      return Equals((Pair<T1, T2>)obj);
    }

    public bool Equals(Pair<T1, T2> obj) {
      if(ReferenceEquals(null, obj)) return false;
      if(ReferenceEquals(this, obj)) return true;
      return Equals(obj.Left, Left) && Equals(obj.Right, Right);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode() {
      unchecked {
        return (Left.GetHashCode()*397)^Right.GetHashCode();
      }
    }
  }
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I wrote and have used this with success.

public class MultiKeyDictionary<K1, K2, V> : Dictionary<K1, Dictionary<K2, V>>  {

    public V this[K1 key1, K2 key2] {
        get {
            if (!ContainsKey(key1) || !this[key1].ContainsKey(key2))
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
            return base[key1][key2];
        }
        set {
            if (!ContainsKey(key1))
                this[key1] = new Dictionary<K2, V>();
            this[key1][key2] = value;
        }
    }

    public void Add(K1 key1, K2 key2, V value) {
            if (!ContainsKey(key1))
                this[key1] = new Dictionary<K2, V>();
            this[key1][key2] = value;
    }

    public bool ContainsKey(K1 key1, K2 key2) {
        return base.ContainsKey(key1) && this[key1].ContainsKey(key2);
    }

    public new IEnumerable<V> Values {
        get {
            return from baseDict in base.Values
                   from baseKey in baseDict.Keys
                   select baseDict[baseKey];
        }
    } 

}


public class MultiKeyDictionary<K1, K2, K3, V> : Dictionary<K1, MultiKeyDictionary<K2, K3, V>> {
    public V this[K1 key1, K2 key2, K3 key3] {
        get {
            return ContainsKey(key1) ? this[key1][key2, key3] : default(V);
        }
        set {
            if (!ContainsKey(key1))
                this[key1] = new MultiKeyDictionary<K2, K3, V>();
            this[key1][key2, key3] = value;
        }
    }

    public bool ContainsKey(K1 key1, K2 key2, K3 key3) {
        return base.ContainsKey(key1) && this[key1].ContainsKey(key2, key3);
    }
}

public class MultiKeyDictionary<K1, K2, K3, K4, V> : Dictionary<K1, MultiKeyDictionary<K2, K3, K4, V>> {
    public V this[K1 key1, K2 key2, K3 key3, K4 key4] {
        get {
            return ContainsKey(key1) ? this[key1][key2, key3, key4] : default(V);
        }
        set {
            if (!ContainsKey(key1))
                this[key1] = new MultiKeyDictionary<K2, K3, K4, V>();
            this[key1][key2, key3, key4] = value;
        }
    }

    public bool ContainsKey(K1 key1, K2 key2, K3 key3, K4 key4) {
        return base.ContainsKey(key1) && this[key1].ContainsKey(key2, key3, key4);
    }
}

public class MultiKeyDictionary<K1, K2, K3, K4, K5, V> : Dictionary<K1, MultiKeyDictionary<K2, K3, K4, K5, V>> {
    public V this[K1 key1, K2 key2, K3 key3, K4 key4, K5 key5] {
        get {
            return ContainsKey(key1) ? this[key1][key2, key3, key4, key5] : default(V);
        }
        set {
            if (!ContainsKey(key1))
                this[key1] = new MultiKeyDictionary<K2, K3, K4, K5, V>();
            this[key1][key2, key3, key4, key5] = value;
        }
    }

    public bool ContainsKey(K1 key1, K2 key2, K3 key3, K4 key4, K5 key5) {
        return base.ContainsKey(key1) && this[key1].ContainsKey(key2, key3, key4, key5);
    }
}

public class MultiKeyDictionary<K1, K2, K3, K4, K5, K6, V> : Dictionary<K1, MultiKeyDictionary<K2, K3, K4, K5, K6, V>> {
    public V this[K1 key1, K2 key2, K3 key3, K4 key4, K5 key5, K6 key6] {
        get {
            return ContainsKey(key1) ? this[key1][key2, key3, key4, key5, key6] : default(V);
        }
        set {
            if (!ContainsKey(key1))
                this[key1] = new MultiKeyDictionary<K2, K3, K4, K5, K6, V>();
            this[key1][key2, key3, key4, key5, key6] = value;
        }
    }
    public bool ContainsKey(K1 key1, K2 key2, K3 key3, K4 key4, K5 key5, K6 key6) {
        return base.ContainsKey(key1) && this[key1].ContainsKey(key2, key3, key4, key5, key6);
    }
}

public class MultiKeyDictionary<K1, K2, K3, K4, K5, K6, K7, V> : Dictionary<K1, MultiKeyDictionary<K2, K3, K4, K5, K6, K7, V>> {
    public V this[K1 key1, K2 key2, K3 key3, K4 key4, K5 key5, K6 key6, K7 key7] {
        get {
            return ContainsKey(key1) ? this[key1][key2, key3, key4, key5, key6, key7] : default(V);
        }
        set {
            if (!ContainsKey(key1))
                this[key1] = new MultiKeyDictionary<K2, K3, K4, K5, K6, K7, V>();
            this[key1][key2, key3, key4, key5, key6, key7] = value;
        }
    }
    public bool ContainsKey(K1 key1, K2 key2, K3 key3, K4 key4, K5 key5, K6 key6, K7 key7) {
        return base.ContainsKey(key1) && this[key1].ContainsKey(key2, key3, key4, key5, key6, key7);
    }
}

public class MultiKeyDictionary<K1, K2, K3, K4, K5, K6, K7, K8, V> : Dictionary<K1, MultiKeyDictionary<K2, K3, K4, K5, K6, K7, K8, V>> {
    public V this[K1 key1, K2 key2, K3 key3, K4 key4, K5 key5, K6 key6, K7 key7, K8 key8] {
        get {
            return ContainsKey(key1) ? this[key1][key2, key3, key4, key5, key6, key7, key8] : default(V);
        }
        set {
            if (!ContainsKey(key1))
                this[key1] = new MultiKeyDictionary<K2, K3, K4, K5, K6, K7, K8, V>();
            this[key1][key2, key3, key4, key5, key6, key7, key8] = value;
        }
    }
    public bool ContainsKey(K1 key1, K2 key2, K3 key3, K4 key4, K5 key5, K6 key6, K7 key7, K8 key8) {
        return base.ContainsKey(key1) && this[key1].ContainsKey(key2, key3, key4, key5, key6, key7, key8);
    }
}

public class MultiKeyDictionary<K1, K2, K3, K4, K5, K6, K7, K8, K9, V> : Dictionary<K1, MultiKeyDictionary<K2, K3, K4, K5, K6, K7, K8, K9, V>> {
    public V this[K1 key1, K2 key2, K3 key3, K4 key4, K5 key5, K6 key6, K7 key7, K8 key8, K9 key9] {
        get {
            return ContainsKey(key1) ? this[key1][key2, key3, key4, key5, key6, key7, key8, key9] : default(V);
        }
        set {
            if (!ContainsKey(key1))
                this[key1] = new MultiKeyDictionary<K2, K3, K4, K5, K6, K7, K8, K9, V>();
            this[key1][key2, key3, key4, key5, key6, key7, key8, key9] = value;
        }
    }
    public bool ContainsKey(K1 key1, K2 key2, K3 key3, K4 key4, K5 key5, K6 key6, K7 key7, K8 key8, K9 key9) {
        return base.ContainsKey(key1) && this[key1].ContainsKey(key2, key3, key4, key5, key6, key7, key8, key9);
    }
}

public class MultiKeyDictionary<K1, K2, K3, K4, K5, K6, K7, K8, K9, K10, V> : Dictionary<K1, MultiKeyDictionary<K2, K3, K4, K5, K6, K7, K8, K9, K10, V>> {
    public V this[K1 key1, K2 key2, K3 key3, K4 key4, K5 key5, K6 key6, K7 key7, K8 key8, K9 key9, K10 key10] {
        get {
            return ContainsKey(key1) ? this[key1][key2, key3, key4, key5, key6, key7, key8, key9, key10] : default(V);
        }
        set {
            if (!ContainsKey(key1))
                this[key1] = new MultiKeyDictionary<K2, K3, K4, K5, K6, K7, K8, K9, K10, V>();
            this[key1][key2, key3, key4, key5, key6, key7, key8, key9, key10] = value;
        }
    }
    public bool ContainsKey(K1 key1, K2 key2, K3 key3, K4 key4, K5 key5, K6 key6, K7 key7, K8 key8, K9 key9, K10 key10) {
        return base.ContainsKey(key1) && this[key1].ContainsKey(key2, key3, key4, key5, key6, key7, key8, key9, key10);
    }
}

public class MultiKeyDictionary<K1, K2, K3, K4, K5, K6, K7, K8, K9, K10, K11, V> : Dictionary<K1, MultiKeyDictionary<K2, K3, K4, K5, K6, K7, K8, K9, K10, K11, V>> {
    public V this[K1 key1, K2 key2, K3 key3, K4 key4, K5 key5, K6 key6, K7 key7, K8 key8, K9 key9, K10 key10, K11 key11] {
        get {
            return ContainsKey(key1) ? this[key1][key2, key3, key4, key5, key6, key7, key8, key9, key10, key11] : default(V);
        }
        set {
            if (!ContainsKey(key1))
                this[key1] = new MultiKeyDictionary<K2, K3, K4, K5, K6, K7, K8, K9, K10, K11, V>();
            this[key1][key2, key3, key4, key5, key6, key7, key8, key9, key10, key11] = value;
        }
    }
    public bool ContainsKey(K1 key1, K2 key2, K3 key3, K4 key4, K5 key5, K6 key6, K7 key7, K8 key8, K9 key9, K10 key10, K11 key11) {
        return base.ContainsKey(key1) && this[key1].ContainsKey(key2, key3, key4, key5, key6, key7, key8, key9, key10, key11);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I wrote a ToMultiKeyDictionary() extension for this answer and posted it as an answer below –  Katbyte Jan 21 at 23:04
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I think you would need a Tuple2 like class. Be sure that it's GetHashCode() and Equals() is based upon the two contained elements.

See Tuples in C#

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Could you use a Dictionary<TKey1,Dictionary<TKey2,TValue>>?

You could even subclass this:

public class DualKeyDictionary<TKey1,TKey2,TValue> : Dictionary<TKey1,Dictionary<TKey2,TValue>>

EDIT: This is now a duplicate answer. It also is limited in its practicality. While it does "work" and provide ability to code dict[key1][key2], there are lots of "workarounds" to get it to "just work".

HOWEVER: Just for kicks, one could implement Dictionary nonetheless, but at this point it gets a little verbose:

public class DualKeyDictionary<TKey1, TKey2, TValue> : Dictionary<TKey1, Dictionary<TKey2, TValue>> , IDictionary< object[], TValue >
{
	#region IDictionary<object[],TValue> Members

	void IDictionary<object[], TValue>.Add( object[] key, TValue value )
	{
		if ( key == null || key.Length != 2 )
			throw new ArgumentException( "Invalid Key" );

		TKey1 key1 = key[0] as TKey1;
		TKey2 key2 = key[1] as TKey2;

		if ( !ContainsKey( key1 ) )
			Add( key1, new Dictionary<TKey2, TValue>() );

		this[key1][key2] = value;
	}

	bool IDictionary<object[], TValue>.ContainsKey( object[] key )
	{
		if ( key == null || key.Length != 2 )
			throw new ArgumentException( "Invalid Key" );

		TKey1 key1 = key[0] as TKey1;
		TKey2 key2 = key[1] as TKey2;

		if ( !ContainsKey( key1 ) )
			return false;

		if ( !this[key1].ContainsKey( key2 ) )
			return false;

		return true;
	}
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1  
I see, Charles is thinking the same thing. The problem with these is, however, in the allocation. It might be a beast to manage. –  maxwellb Jul 23 '09 at 13:52
    
+1 for the naming, DualKey.. Have been looking for a good name :) –  nawfal Mar 30 '13 at 8:28
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If anyone is looking for a ToMultiKeyDictionary() here is an implementation that should work with most of the answers here (based on Herman's):

public static class Extensions_MultiKeyDictionary {

    public static MultiKeyDictionary<K1, K2, V> ToMultiKeyDictionary<S, K1, K2, V>(this IEnumerable<S> items, Func<S, K1> key1, Func<S, K2> key2, Func<S, V> value) {
        var dict = new MultiKeyDictionary<K1, K2, V>(); 
        foreach (S i in items) { 
            dict.Add(key1(i), key2(i), value(i)); 
        } 
        return dict; 
    }

    public static MultiKeyDictionary<K1, K2, K3, V> ToMultiKeyDictionary<S, K1, K2, K3, V>(this IEnumerable<S> items, Func<S, K1> key1, Func<S, K2> key2, Func<S, K3> key3, Func<S, V> value) {
        var dict = new MultiKeyDictionary<K1, K2, K3, V>(); 
        foreach (S i in items) { 
            dict.Add(key1(i), key2(i), key3(i), value(i)); 
        } 
        return dict; 
    }
}
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Here's my implementation. I wanted something to hide the implementation of the Tuple concept.

  public class TwoKeyDictionary<TKey1, TKey2, TValue> : Dictionary<TwoKey<TKey1, TKey2>, TValue>
  {
    public static TwoKey<TKey1, TKey2> Key(TKey1 key1, TKey2 key2)
    {
      return new TwoKey<TKey1, TKey2>(key1, key2);
    }

    public TValue this[TKey1 key1, TKey2 key2]
    {
      get { return this[Key(key1, key2)]; }
      set { this[Key(key1, key2)] = value; }
    }

    public void Add(TKey1 key1, TKey2 key2, TValue value)
    {
      Add(Key(key1, key2), value);
    }

    public bool ContainsKey(TKey1 key1, TKey2 key2)
    {
      return ContainsKey(Key(key1, key2));
    }
  }

  public class TwoKey<TKey1, TKey2> : Tuple<TKey1, TKey2>
  {
    public TwoKey(TKey1 item1, TKey2 item2) : base(item1, item2) { }

    public override string ToString()
    {
      return string.Format("({0},{1})", Item1, Item2);
    }
  }

It helps keeps the usage looking like a Dictionary

item.Add(1, "D", 5.6);

value = item[1, "D"];
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Many good solutions here, What is missing here is an implementation using the build in Tuple class, so I wrote one myself.

Since it just inherits from `Dictionary> you can always use both ways.

var dict = new Dictionary<int, int, Row>();
var row = new Row();
dict.Add(1, 2, row);
dict.Add(Tuple.Create(1, 2, row));
dict.Add(new Tuple<int, int>(1, 2));

here is the code.

public class Dictionary<TKey1,TKey2,TValue> :  Dictionary<Tuple<TKey1, TKey2>, TValue>, IDictionary<Tuple<TKey1, TKey2>, TValue>
{

    public TValue this[TKey1 key1, TKey2 key2]
    {
        get { return base[Tuple.Create(key1, key2)]; }
    }

    public void Add(TKey1 key1, TKey2 key2, TValue value)
    {
        base.Add(Tuple.Create(key1, key2), value);
    }

    public bool ContainsKey(TKey1 key1, TKey2 key2)
    {
        return base.ContainsKey(Tuple.Create(key1, key2));
    }
}

Please be aware that this implementation depends on the Tuple.Equals() implementation itself:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd270346(v=vs.110).aspx

The obj parameter is considered to be equal to the current instance under the following conditions:

  • It is a Tuple object.
  • Its two components are of the same types as the current instance.
  • Its two components are equal to those of the current instance. Equality is determined by the default object equality comparer for each component.
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Here's another example using the Tuple class with the Dictionary.

        // Setup Dictionary
    Dictionary<Tuple<string, string>, string> testDictionary = new Dictionary<Tuple<string, string>, string>
    {
        {new Tuple<string, string>("key1","key2"), "value1"},
        {new Tuple<string, string>("key1","key3"), "value2"},
        {new Tuple<string, string>("key2","key3"), "value3"}
    };
    //Query Dictionary
    public string FindValue(string stuff1, string stuff2)
    {
        return testDictionary[Tuple.Create(stuff1, stuff2)];
    }
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