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snprintf in a loop does not work on linux but it works properly on windows.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

    int main( int argc, char **argv) {
      char buffer[255] ={0};
      for ( int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        snprintf(buffer, 255, "%s:%x\0",buffer,  i );
      }
      printf ( "BUFFER  = %s\n", buffer );
      return 0;
    }

This code does not append existing buffer but only takes the last iteration value.

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6  
Just a guess that printing buffer to buffer is undefined, so just seems to work, sometimes. –  Bo Persson Jul 30 '12 at 9:25
    
@R. Martinho Fernandes, yes on windows it append to the buffer –  Avinash Jul 30 '12 at 9:26
2  
@Avinash so Windows is crappy and doesn't obey standards (again) while Linux does. UNIX powwa! –  user529758 Jul 30 '12 at 9:29
2  
@H2CO3 No. This code doesn't obey standards. Neither of the implementations (this is not about OSes, but about C library implementations) is wrong. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 30 '12 at 9:29
    
If you want to append, use the strcat function instead. Also note that you don't need to explicitly add the string terminator '\0', it's added automatically. –  Joachim Pileborg Jul 30 '12 at 9:30

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can avoid the undefined behavior of using the buffer both as the target string and as an argument like this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main( int argc, char **argv) {
  char buffer[255] ={0};
  int offset = 0;
  for ( int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    offset += snprintf(buffer + offset, 255 - offset, ":%x\0", i);
  }
  printf ( "BUFFER  = %s\n", buffer );
  return 0;
}
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1  
Beware that with more than 10 iterations, you could overflow the buffer. I feel that the 255 argument to your snprintf is wrong. –  Basile Starynkevitch Jul 30 '12 at 9:32
    
It should probably be 255 - (offset - buffer), or something like that. –  Kerrek SB Jul 30 '12 at 9:33
    
Basile Starynkevitch and Kerrek SB: Thanks for the remarks. I've updated my answer. –  Codo Jul 30 '12 at 9:42
1  
You'll need to break the loop when offset >= sizeof(buffer) –  Basile Starynkevitch Jul 30 '12 at 10:22

sprintf()'ing the result array to itself is undefined behaviour.

EDIT: if you want some code that works, here you are: use strcat() (or the safer strncat, etc. insert usual security discussion about buffer overflow here):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main( int argc, char **argv) {
    char buffer[255] = { 0 };
    char fmtbuf[64];

    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        snprintf(fmtbuf, 64, "%x", fmtbuf, i);
        strcat(buffer, fmtbuf);
    }

    printf ("BUFFER  = %s\n", buffer);
    return 0;
}

Also note that printf() calls don't need the terminating zero to be written out manually -- it's automatically added.

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The standard specifically states that this code is not expected to work. Firstly, the initial buffer argument is declared restrict, which means that it cannot alias another argument. Secondly, the standard has the following clause just for emphasis:

7.19.6.5 The snprintf function

Description

2 - [...] If copying takes place between objects that overlap, the behavior is undefined.

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You could not write 'buffer' to itself by 'snprintf'.

The test code is as follow:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <cstring>

int main( int argc, char **argv) {
    char buffer[255] ={0};
    for ( int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        char tmp[255] = {0};
        strcpy(tmp, buffer);
        snprintf(buffer, 255, "%s:%x\0",tmp,  i );
        printf ( "BUFFER  = %s\n", buffer );
        }
    printf ( "BUFFER  = %s\n", buffer );  
    return 0;
}
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snprintf does work as specified on Linux, but your code does not append it. Read the Note in the linked documentation!

You should not use as its arguments (after the format string) the destination.

If you want it to append, either ensure that you don't overflow your fixed buffer, or reallocate that buffer when it gets too small.

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