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Sometimes I see people send json to server as :

$.ajax({
url: ...
contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
dataType: "json",
data: { 'page': '100AAAAAf00' },
responseType: "json",
success: ...,
error: ...
});

but { 'page': '100AAAAAf00' } is not Json.

and were saying contentType is json ...

Json is the text representation.

e.g. : "{ 'page': '100AAAAAf00' }"

Am I missing something here ? ( Does jQuery is doing some translations behind the scenes ?)

Wiki :

JSON or JavaScript Object Notation, is a text-based (!!) open standard designed for human-readable data interchange.

share|improve this question
    
Why this question is being downvoted ? –  Royi Namir Jul 30 '12 at 10:05
    
I can only guess, I didn't downvote myself, but: because you start out by saying "it is not json", which is kinda.. well.. not true. SO any question coming from that statement is a bit strange, as it started with a hypothesis that is invalid. You might have gotten away with actually asking "is this JSON" instead of just saying it isn't? –  Nanne Jul 30 '12 at 10:11
    
@Nanne { 'page': '100AAAAAf00' } is not Json. TRy to PARSE it and youll see !!! –  Royi Namir Jul 30 '12 at 10:12
2  
A lot of people do not understand that Javascript object literals and JSON are not the same thing. I would guess these are the people downvoting. –  nnnnnn Jul 30 '12 at 10:32
1  
There are even forms of JSON that are not syntactically valid javascript. For example {"hello":"world", "key": "value"} cannot be evaluated as valid javascript as is. Maybe this helps some people see that they are separate languages. Javascript.parse is aliased eval to make it more effective. –  Esailija Jul 30 '12 at 16:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
$.ajax("/", {

    contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
    dataType: "json",
    data: {
        'page': '100AAAAAf00'
    },
    type: 'POST',
    responseType: "json"

});

Is wrong. This will send a normal application/x-www-form-urlencoded request with the request body:

page=100AAAAAf00

But since the header is "application/json; charset=utf-8", it is actually lying to the server.

To send, real, pure, actual JSON to the server with jQuery, you would use:

$.ajax("/", {

    contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
    dataType: "json",
    data: JSON.stringify({ //If data is string, jQuery will not try to process it
        'page': '100AAAAAf00'
    }),
    type: 'POST',
    responseType: "json"

});

Now the request body will be:

{"page":"100AAAAAf00"}

And that cannot be used with php's $_POST at all since it works on the basis of application/x-www-form-urlencoded, so maybe that's why people prefer the former..

One can use Chrome's network tab in developer tools to verify my claims here:

http://jsfiddle.net/sV5m4/1/ - Actual json with json header

enter image description here

and here:

http://jsfiddle.net/sV5m4/2/ - x-www-form-urlencoded with header that claims to be json

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. So my question was in place , right ? I did noticed the problematic situation code problem.....right ? ( like in my main question sample)... –  Royi Namir Jul 30 '12 at 15:32
1  
@RoyiNamir yes the code sample in your question does not send json but x-www-form-urlencoded –  Esailija Jul 30 '12 at 15:36
    
:-( So I dont understand why this question was downvoted.... I think they didnt know the difference at all... –  Royi Namir Jul 30 '12 at 15:37
    
Thanks for Everything. –  Royi Namir Jul 30 '12 at 15:38
1  
@RoyiNamir if it helps, I upvoted your question :P –  Esailija Jul 30 '12 at 15:38

There is a simple function to convert an object to a JSON string...

JSON.stringify({ 'page': '100AAAAAf00' }) // => '{ "page": "100AAAAAf00" }'

The other way around...

JSON.parse('{ "page": "100AAAAAf00" }') // => { page: '100AAAAAf00' }
share|improve this answer

In your example everything is correct and data property is an object.

Due to jQuery.ajax(); docs data property could be object, array or string.

If it's an array or an object jQuery serializes it.

share|improve this answer
1  
so the data itself is not json. –  Royi Namir Jul 30 '12 at 10:08
    
If you set a string, then you can set the JSON directly. But obviously, anything that is not a string, cannot be JSON (because JSON is a text format). –  Thilo Jul 30 '12 at 10:09
1  
In your case it's not JSON. It's an object. –  s.webbandit Jul 30 '12 at 10:09

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