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I am looking for a regex that is capable of validating that a string contains any number from 0 upwards and also allows for a decimal point to be at any position other than something like .1 or .45. By the decimal being at any point I mean the number should be capable of having any number of precision places.

Numbers could really be anything:

1
2
3.5
3.58278723475
6523424.82347265

I have this which of course fails as my regex doesnt take decimal points into account:

 foreach (string[] coorPairArray in extents.Select(t => t.Trim().Split(' ')))
 {
     Regex isnumber = new Regex("^[0-9]+$");

     if ((!isnumber.IsMatch(coorPairArray[0]) || (!isnumber.IsMatch(coorPairArray[1]))))
     {
         dataBaseConnection.Close();

         throw new ArgumentException("Error: An extent value contained alphanumeric data. GetExtentsAsGml().");
     }
  }
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1  
Minor point: I would move the "isNumber" initialisation outside the foreach loop (or even to a static field): no need to re-initialize it on every run through the loop. Saves a few microseconds :-) –  Hans Kesting Jul 30 '12 at 10:12
    
Yes good point. :) –  CSharpened Jul 30 '12 at 10:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This should do the work:

 Regex isnumber = new Regex(@"^[0-9]+(\.[0-9]+)?$");
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this will allow 001 as valid. –  Fakrudeen Jul 30 '12 at 19:46
    
You are right, better solution is ^[1-9]*([1-9]|0)?(\.[0-9]+)?$ –  Mennan Kara Jul 30 '12 at 19:52

Do you even need a regex for this? Wouldn't something like this work:

foreach (string[] coorPairArray in extents.Select(t => t.Trim().Split(' '))) 
{
    var lat = Decimal.MinValue;
    var lng = Decimal.MinValue;
    if (!Decimal.TryParse(coorPairArray[0], out lat) || !Decimal.TryParse(coorPairArray[1], out lng))
    {
         dataBaseConnection.Close(); 
         throw new ArgumentException("Error: An extent value contained alphanumeric data. GetExtentsAsGml().");
    }

    // do something with lat/lng
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Maybe but I was still interested to see what the regex was. Thanks though. –  CSharpened Jul 30 '12 at 10:11
[1-9][0-9]*(\.[0-9]+)? | 0\.[0-9]+

First one is for normal numbers. Second one to handle things like 0.1

Of course add ^ and $ as required.

I would rather go with James' answer instead of this. it is only for curiosity.

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Better to do a tryparse as in @James answer, if you want to go throught the regex then here is a sample :

[Test]
[TestCase("1")]
[TestCase("2")]
[TestCase("3.5")]
[TestCase("3.58278723475")]
[TestCase("6523424.82347265")]
public void FluentCalculator_Test(string testSource)
{
    var match = Regex.Match(testSource, @"^(?:[-+]?[1-9]\d*|0)?(?:\.\d+)?$");
    Assert.IsTrue(match.Success);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can you tell me why it is better to do the tryParse rather than the regex? In my code the try parse doesnt really fit in well so I will stick with the regex for now but what are the reasons for favouring a tryparse? +1 for the useful unit test btw :) –  CSharpened Jul 30 '12 at 10:21
2  
@CSharpened TryParse is built into the Framework therefore will not break in future versions of .NET (unless of course they change the TryParse method which is highly unlikely). Also IMO you are sort of misusing regex in this scenario. Your not trying to match data, your trying to validate it so actually try parse is a better fit. If your worried about what the code looks like then why not just introduce a helper method e.g. ValidateCoordinates and then you abstract the validation logic which gives you the flexibility of changing it without affecting your business logic. –  James Jul 30 '12 at 10:25
    
Thats actually a very good idea and some good reasons too James. Thanks. In terms of the actual regex I will have to keep Mennans answer as the correct one as it answered my question. Thinking about it now though I will abstract out the functionality as you mentioned. Dont know why I didnt think about that as I have done similar elsewhere in the solution. –  CSharpened Jul 30 '12 at 10:32
    
Also, here you can find some info about regex vs tryparse stackoverflow.com/questions/5715200/… –  Giorgio Minardi Jul 30 '12 at 10:37

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