Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a memory mapped file, from which I wish to parse the contents of the buffer. The mmap() returns success, and I can print out the buffer contents to a file using fprintf successfully. However, when I try to access the buffer as an array in my program directly, I get a segmentation fault. Why is this happening? Here is the code:

  #define PTT_DUMP "/home/dhruv/somefile"     
  .
  .
  .

  int fd_ptt_dump = open(PTT_DUMP, O_RDONLY);
  struct stat struct_ptt_dump;
  fstat(fd_ptt_dump, &struct_ptt_dump);
  printf("\n\n\t\t\t --- The size of the dump is = %d -----\n\n",    struct_ptt_dump.st_size);
  char *membuffer;
  char pid_num[100];
  char cycles[100], instr[100], cpi[100] ;
  int pid_index =0;
  int cycles_index = 0;
  int instr_index = 0;
  int cpi_index = 0 ;
  int len = (int)struct_ptt_dump.st_size;
  int newline_count = 0;
  int n = 0;
  if( (membuffer = mmap(0, struct_ptt_dump.st_size, PROT_READ, MAP_FILE | MAP_PRIVATE, fd_ptt_dump, 0)) == (caddr_t) -1)
   err_sys("mmap error");

  /* If the following is uncommented, it prints fine */

  /*
  for ( n =0; n < struct_ptt_dump.st_size ; n++)      
  fprintf(fp_logfile,"%c", membuffer[n]);
  */

  /* But, I really want to access the buffer as an array for speed if possible */
  /* Here is where everything goes haywire */

  while (newline_count != 5)
   if ( membuffer[n++] == '\n' )
    newline_count++ ;

  /* printf returns OK, and I am able to skip newlines */

  printf("\n\n newlines = %d\n\n 10 buffer characters", newline_count);

  int k =0;


  /* All code from here gives segmentation fault */

  while ( membuffer[n++] != ' ' )
pid_num[pid_index++] = membuffer[n] ;

  /* Even if I comment out everything from here on, the above assignment itself results in a segmentation fault */


  pid_num[pid_index] = '\0';

  printf("\n\n pid = %s", pid_num);



  while ( membuffer[len--] != ' ' )
if ( membuffer[len] != '\n' )
  cpi[cpi_index++] = membuffer[len];

  cpi[cpi_index] = '\0';

  for( ; membuffer[len] == ' ' ; len-- )
;

  for(n=0; membuffer[len-n] != ' '; n++)
instr[instr_index++] = membuffer[len-n] ;

  instr[instr_index] = '\0' ;
  n++;

  for( ; membuffer[len-n] != ' ' ; n++)
cycles[cycles_index++] = membuffer[len-n];

  cycles[cycles_index] = '\0';

  printf("\n\n\t\t\t\t ********** buffer values *************\n\n");
  printf("\t\t\t\tdominant pid = %s\t cycles = %s\t instructions = %s\t cpi = %s \n\n", pid_num, cycles, instr, cpi);



  fflush(STDOUT_FILENO);
share|improve this question
    
please run with gdb and specify the stack (where command in gdb). –  Drakosha Jul 23 '09 at 14:11
    
Are there any restrictions on using the buffer directly? I could be messing up in the whiles and ifs and storing something more than I allocated for, but I was wondering if it is possible to access the memory directly in the first place or not. I know that accessing the buffer for the first time will raise a page fault but it should not really matter. As a side question, if some other process is scheduled due to a context switch right after the printf("\n\n newlines = %d .."), will the contents of buffer be restored when this process is again scheduled? –  Dhruv Jul 23 '09 at 14:17
    
@Drakosha Yes, I will do that and get back here with the stack info. –  Dhruv Jul 23 '09 at 14:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How big is pid_index getting? Are you perhaps reading more than 100 characters without finding a space?

By the way, this

while ( membuffer[n++] != ' ' )
    pid_num[pid_index++] = membuffer[n] ;

should probably be this

while ( membuffer[n] != ' ' )
    pid_num[pid_index++] = membuffer[n++] ;

No?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for pointing that out. The pid_index was indeed oveflowing. The program now works fine. –  Dhruv Jul 24 '09 at 13:41
  • You aren't checking that n stays < struct_ptt_dump.st_size
  • You aren't checking that pid_index stays < 100
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I put those bounds into the program for more robustness. –  Dhruv Jul 24 '09 at 13:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.