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some of my controller actions require a user to be authenticated. Those actions are flagged with a custom [Authorize] attribute. Behind the scene, a custom membership provider does some magic, among which setting some temporary data into the common-thread.

At the end of each action that required an authentication, a call to the OnActionExecuted() filter is required to cleanup the thread. This is done via another custom attribute called [CleanupContext].

So my actions look like this:

[Authorize]
[CleanupContext]
public ViewResult Action()
{
   ...
}

Since those two are always used together, since I am lazy and since I fear that someday one dev might forget to put one or the other and we end up with some weird behavior: is there a way to combine them into one attribute?

[AuthorizeAndCleanup]
public ViewResult Action()
{
   // Aaah, if only it could look like this :D
}

Thanks a lot!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could derive from AuthorizeAttribute in order to do your custom authorization stuff and implement IActionFilter in order to have access to the OnActionExecuting and OnActionExecuted events (to do your custom cleanup code):

public class AuthorizeAndCleanupAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute, IActionFilter
{
    protected override bool AuthorizeCore(HttpContextBase httpContext)
    {
        // TODO: your custom authorization logic
        return base.AuthorizeCore(httpContext);
    }

    public void OnActionExecuted(ActionExecutedContext filterContext)
    {
        // TODO: your custom cleanup code
    }

    public void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
    }
}

Obviously you should be aware that neither the OnActionExecuting or the OnActionExecuted events will ever be executed if the authorization fails (a.k.a. the AuthorizeCore method returns false) so make sure you do your cleanup in this method if you are about to return false.

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That's an interesting point. That would obviously work but prevent me from using the two attributes independently in the future. Other than that, interesting editing technique ;) –  Tim Bourguignon Jul 30 '12 at 12:02
1  
Why would that prevent you from using the 2 attributes? You could still keep the 2 attributes if you want to reuse them independently. And for cases where you need to put the 2 attributes, you simply use the custom one that will do the work of the two. –  Darin Dimitrov Jul 30 '12 at 12:03

A quick. dirty and (possibly) slow solution that I can think of is to skip the cleanup attribute and check for the presence of the custom Authorize attribute in the OnActionExecuted() and execute any cleanup code if you find it (since you stated that they are always present together).

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As far as I know, the OnActionExecuted() function will only be executed if the [CleanupContext] attribute is present so I cannot avoid setting it. –  Tim Bourguignon Jul 30 '12 at 11:54
    
OnActionExecuted() gets called after each and every action. I use it to run code based on custom attributes and to process information based on what has happened during the action call. You have access to the full context that the action method had access to including the result that is about to be sent to the client. –  JTMon Jul 30 '12 at 12:03

You should implement your own filter provider (http://bradwilson.typepad.com/blog/2010/07/service-location-pt4-filters.html) which will automatically add Cleanup attribute to any action marked by Authorize.

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