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I recently needed to build C# specific name (which must always include global:: specifier) for an arbitrary type and have come accross following issue:

// 1 - value: System.String[,,,][,,][,]
string unexpectedFullName = typeof( string[,][,,][,,,] ).FullName;      

// 2 - value: System.String[,][,,][,,,]
string expectedFullName = Type.GetType( "System.String[,][,,][,,,]" ).FullName;

I was expecting that returned value would be same in both cases. However, for some reason the array related part of the value seems to be reversed (case 1). Is this reversal expected behavior?

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6  
I've come across this before; it seems that while in C# you declare array indices/dimensions in the order in which you read, reflection returns a type name that matches its logical structure. And a (C#) string[,][,,][,,,] is, after all, a value of type string, thereof a 4-dimensional array (i.e. string[,,,]), thereof a 3-dimensional array (i.e. string[,,,][,,]) and thereof a 2-dimensional array (i.e. string[,,,][,,][,]). –  O. R. Mapper Jul 30 '12 at 11:37
6  
Everything he said ^^^^. The c# syntax (explained in depth here) is not required to match the reflection naming convention. So if you are dealing with reflection: use the reflection naming. In other news, nested types are not Outer.Inner but Outer+Inner instead, and generics aren't Foo<,,> but Foo`3 instead. –  Marc Gravell Jul 30 '12 at 11:45
    
I am generating code based on some input types so I will definitely need to reverse information on indices/dimensions provided via System.Type instance. –  Rest Wing Jul 30 '12 at 12:21
    
@O.R.Mapper: Could one of you post this as an answer so I can accept it? –  Rest Wing Jul 30 '12 at 12:21
    
@MarcGravell: Could one of you post this as an answer so I can accept it? –  Rest Wing Jul 30 '12 at 12:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

While the value returned by Type.FullName and the C# type identifier sometimes happen to be the same, this is not guaranteed. Keep in mind that Type.FullName returns the same value regardless of what CLI language it is called from, be it C#, VB.NET, Oxygene or anything else.

For multidimensional and jagged arrays, C# syntax lists the indices in the order they are written later on, while reflection syntax returns something that matches the logical structure of the array. And a (C#) string[,][,,][,,,] is, after all, a value of type string, thereof a 4-dimensional array (i.e. string[,,,]), thereof a 3-dimensional array (i.e. string[,,,][,,]) and thereof a 2-dimensional array (i.e. string[,,,][,,][,]).

Rather than relying on the reflection syntax name returned by FullName, you might want to examine the properties of the Type class when analyzing types. Information such as the number of dimensions or the generic arguments can be retrieved from there.

When constructing types, you can also use methods such as MakeArrayType or MakeGenericType to create complex types at runtime without constructing a string that contains the ingredients for the new types.

Some of the contents of this answer was pointed out by Marc Gravell - thank you!

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