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I have a program written in Java which uses 3 threads. Everything is working fine in the IDE (Netbeans) and when I kill it it destroys all the threads. When I launch it from the command line and Ctrl-C it the threads keep running. What's the best way to deal with this ?

Does it kill the main thread as I guess I can use flags after that?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

1. You can have some loop control mechanism for your threads using boolean.

2. Else try using Daemon threads, So as there will be No Non-Daemon thread, the JVM will get closed.

By defalut its Non-Daemon, but you can set the thread as Daemon before you call start() method on the thread of execution...

The JVM will terminate ONLY when all the non-daemon threads including the Main thread has terminated.

Eg:

      Thread t = new Thread(MyClass);
      t.setDaemon(true);
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(new Thread(new SerialReader(data, in, "ioReader"))).start(); (new Thread(new SerialWriter(out, "ioWriter"))).start(); (new Thread(new TickTock(data,"timeWatch"))).start(); (new Thread(new testclass(data,"tester"))).start(); (new Thread(new testtimer(data,"ticktick"))).start(); –  DevilCode Jul 30 '12 at 12:43
    
(new Thread(new SerialReader(data, in, "ioReader"))).start(); (new Thread(new SerialWriter(out, "ioWriter"))).start(); (new Thread(new TickTock(data,"timeWatch"))).start(); (new Thread(new testclass(data,"tester"))).start(); (new Thread(new testtimer(data,"ticktick"))).start(); How Would you add setDameon(true) in the above scenario. Am i correct in thinking that if setDaemon is true that if the parent thread is killed any child threads will then die with it ? –  DevilCode Jul 30 '12 at 12:52
    
I said create all the threads as Daemon threads, they work the same, but Unlike the Non-daemon threads, they wont restrict the jvm to terminate, even if they are running. –  Kumar Vivek Mitra Jul 30 '12 at 16:35

You can register a shutdown hook on your main thread to clean up the other threads gracefully.

public static void main(String[] args) {
  Runtime.getRuntime().addShutdownHook(new Thread() {
    public void run() {
      System.out.println("System shutting down");
      // tell your other threads to shut down from here
      // the best way to do this is to set a flag 
      // that they will pick up on and exit gracefully
    }
  });
}
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On most Linux systems that I know about, pressing control-c if the program is in the foreground causes a interrupt signal (SIGINT) sent to the JVM which kills all of the threads (daemon or not) and exits. I tried this stupid little program on Mac OSX and CentOS Linux and it exits fine with control-c.

One thing that has not been mentioned here is that signal handlers may be trapping the interrupt signal. They allow you to catch control-c (and other signals) so you can do something intelligent with them. They are very OS dependent (of course) and if you catch the interrupt signal (SIGINT is usually sent by control-c) and don't stop the JVM, you are going to have problems.

But in any case, you can do something like the following:

...
MyHandler handler = new MyHandler();
// catch the control-c signal, "TERM" is another common kill signal
Signal.handle(new Signal("INT"), handler);
...

private static class MyHandler implements SignalHandler {
    @Override
    public void handle(Signal arg0) {
        // interrupt your threads
        // clean up stuff
        // set shutdown flags
        // ...
    }
}

Again, I would say that it is a bad practice to catch interrupt signal (control-c) and not take the JVM down. This might be the problem with your application.

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Hi Grey thanks for this comment. I have some additional question. If there were no threads just the main class as it were with while true loop. No signal Handlers nothing ... and you Ctrl-C it what happens within the application ? Does it still quit ? –  DevilCode Aug 1 '12 at 17:38
    
Can you add this answer to : stackoverflow.com/questions/11755512/threads-java-inturrupts/… –  DevilCode Aug 1 '12 at 17:39
    
I've added to that question @DevilCode. I was trying to separate my answers however. –  Gray Aug 1 '12 at 17:55
    
The behavior with control-c is OS dependent. Without a signal handler, control-c should bring the JVM down I believe under most Unix variants (including Mac OSX). Is that not working for you @DevilCode? –  Gray Aug 1 '12 at 17:56
    
If it's just a simple main program with a loop its working fine, but if its got threads off of it everything stays running after Ctrl-C. I'm on Ubuntu 12.04. –  DevilCode Aug 1 '12 at 18:06

Does it kill the main thread as I guess I can use flags after that?

I don't know what Ctrl-C in particular does, but if you make your "permanent" threads daemon threads, your app should terminate when all the non-daemon threads have terminated. See the Thread documentation for more details.

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Under Unixen, control-c sends a SIGINT to the JVM which kills it unless you have a signal handler defined. This may be under Windows too. As @Ben mentions, it will call the shutdown hooks on the way down. This is even if you have non-daemon threads running. –  Gray Jul 30 '12 at 15:34
    
@Gray: Yes, that's what I'd normally have expected. It's unclear why that's not happening in this case... –  Jon Skeet Jul 30 '12 at 16:04

You have one thread as a master thread and the others as daemon threads.

Use Thread.setDaemon(true)

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Java executable is made to respond to ctrl-c on Windows (ctrl-\ on unix) by producing a thread dump to stdout. You can still kill it by ctrl-break on Windows.

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Do you have an example ? does it throw some excepton that I can catch? –  DevilCode Jul 30 '12 at 13:31
    
Under Unix @Marko, it is SIGQUIT that generates a thread dump -- not SIGINT. –  Gray Jul 30 '12 at 15:27
    
@gray Yes, right, it's ctrl-\ on unix. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 30 '12 at 15:43

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